Author:
Woodson Collaborative, Taylor M. Snow
Subject:
History/Social Sciences, American History, Government and Civics, Virginia History
Material Type:
Lesson
Level:
Middle School, High School
Tags:
Celebration, Emancipation, Freedom, Holidays, Juneteenth, US-II, Woodson Collaborative
License:
Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial
Language:
English
Media Formats:
Downloadable docs, Text/HTML

Education Standards

Juneteenth

Juneteenth

Overview

Students will read General Order #3, the order that notified enslaved people in Texas that the Civil War had ended and they were to be emancipated. They will then analyze a primary source broadside from the Virginia Museum of History and Culture related to the earliest celebrations of Juneteenth. They will then be asked to write a letter to a member of their division’s central office regarding the celebration of Juneteenth.

INSTRUCTOR PAGE

US History 1865 - Present / 6-8

Authors: Taylor Snow (Henrico County)

 

Task Overview: Students will read General Order #3, the order that notified enslaved people in Texas that the Civil War had ended and they were to be emancipated. They will then analyze a primary source broadside from the Virginia Museum of History and Culture related to the earliest celebrations of Juneteenth. They will then be asked to write a letter to a member of their division’s central office regarding the celebration of Juneteenth.

 

Targeted SOLs: 

USII.1 The student will demonstrate skills for historical thinking, geographical analysis, economic decision making, and responsible citizenship by

a) analyzing and interpreting artifacts and primary and secondary sources to understand events in United States history;

g) explaining connections across time and place

 

USII.3 The student will apply social science skills to understand the effects of Reconstruction on American life by

a) analyzing the impact of the 13th, 14th, and 15th Amendments to the Constitution of the United States and how they changed the meaning of citizenship;

 

 

Unpacked Standards:

Know (facts)

Understand (concepts)

Do (skills)

Students should know what Juneteenth is and why it is celebrated.

 

 

 

 

Students should understand that even with emancipation, African Americans have had to persist in claiming rights to which they’re entitled by the Constitution.

1a - analyze information sources

1g - making connections between past and present

 

 

 

 

 

Instructor Directions:

1. Students should first be asked to read “Source B” and complete the related analysis questions. They should then look at “Source A” and complete the related analysis questions. Finally, they should look at “Source C” and complete the related analysis questions. 

    1. You may have them do this individually, in groups where they analyze all three sources or as a jigsaw where groups focus on one source and one set of questions and then share their answers with those who analyzed different documents.

2. Then you will assign students the “How Should We Celebrate Emancipation” analysis. This includes two questions to assist them in synthesizing their thoughts, followed by an authentic writing prompt. Teachers could turn this prompt into a larger assessment where students complete presentations to share their written thoughts with audiences ranging from their peers to actual school board members.

 

Resources (see attached Word documents):

Source B

Source B Analysis

Source A

Source A Analysis

Source C

Source C Analysis

How Should We Celebrate Emancipation

 

 

 

 

 

 

STUDENT PAGE

 

Directions:

1. Read “Source B” and complete the related analysis questions.

2. Next, read “Source A” and complete the related analysis questions.

3. Finally, read “Source C” and complete the related analysis questions. 

4. Complete the analysis document “How Should We Celebrate Emancipation.” The first two questions assist you to synthesize your thoughts, while the third tasks you with communicating your conclusions.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   By the Dr. Carter G. Woodson Collaborative, 2021

Cover Image Credit: Wikimedia