Author:
Woodson Collaborative, Lillian Allen-Brown
Subject:
History/Social Sciences, American History, World History
Material Type:
Lesson
Level:
Middle School, High School
Tags:
US-II, Woodson Collaborative, World War I, World War II
License:
Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial
Language:
English
Media Formats:
Downloadable docs, Text/HTML

Education Standards

World Wars Venn

World Wars Venn

Overview

The student or small groups will compare and contrast the major events of World War I and II, as a review activity. The student(s) will sort the responses to show the similarities and differences between the 2 World Wars and their outcomes. This Learning Experience can be implemented individually, in a small group, or “draw a random student in class” type of learning experience.

INSTRUCTOR PAGE

 

 

 

This activity can be used hands-on or digitallythrough Jamboard

United States History II / 7th grade and Secondary History

Author: Lillian Brown: Portsmouth Public Schools

 

Task Overview: 

The student or small groups will compare and contrast the major events of World War I and II, as a review activity. The student(s) will sort the responses to show the similarities and differences between the 2 World Wars and their outcomes. This Learning Experience can be implemented individually, in a small group, or “draw a random student in class” type of learning experience.

Targeted SOLs: US II. 5, 6b, 7, 8

USII.1  The student will demonstrate skills for historical thinking, geographical analysis, economic decision making, and responsible citizenship by

c) interpreting charts, graphs, and pictures to determine characteristics of people, places, or events in United States history;

d) using evidence to draw conclusions and make generalizations;

h) using a decision-making model to identify costs and benefits of a specific choice made;

 

USII.5  The student will apply social science skills to understand the changing role of the United States from the late nineteenth century through World War I by

a) explaining the reasons for and results of the Spanish-American War;

b) describing Theodore Roosevelt’s impact on the foreign policy of the United States; and

c) evaluating and explaining the reasons for the United States’ involvement in World War I and its international leadership role at the conclusion of the war.

 

USII.6  The student will apply social science skills to understand the social, economic, and technological changes of the early twentieth century by

b) describing the social and economic changes that took place, including prohibition and the Great Migration north and west;

d) analyzing the causes of the Great Depression, its impact on Americans, and the major features of Franklin D. Roosevelt’s New Deal.

 

USII.7  The student will apply social science skills to understand the major causes and effects of American involvement in World War II by

a)   explaining the causes and events that led to American involvement in the war, including the attack on Pearl Harbor;

b)   locating and describing the major events and turning points of the war in Europe and the Pacific; and

c)   explaining and evaluating the impact of the war on the home front.

 

USII.8  The student will apply social science skills to understand the economic, social, and political transformation of the United States and the world between the end of World War II and the present by

a) describing the rebuilding of Europe and Japan after World War II, the emergence of the United States and the Soviet Union as superpowers, and the establishment of the United Nations;

b) describing the conversion from a wartime to a peacetime economy;

c) examining the role of the United States in defending freedom during the Cold War, including the wars in Korea and Vietnam, the Cuban missile crisis, the collapse of communism in Europe, and the rise of new challenges;

d) describing the changing patterns of society, including expanded educational and economic opportunities for military veterans, women, and minorities; and

e) evaluating and explaining the impact of international trade and globalization on American life.

 

Unpacked Standards:

Know (facts)

Understand (concepts)

Do (skills)

VDOE US II 6b

  • World War I created opportunities for African Americans when immigration from Europe stopped and the needs of the military suddenly increased.
  • African Americans moved to cities in the North and Midwest in search of better employment opportunities

.

VDOE USII.7c

  • American involvement in World War II brought an end to the Great Depression. Factories and workers were needed to produce goods to win the war.
  • More than 125,000 African Americans fought for the United States.

Essential Knowledge

  • American involvement in World War II brought an end to the Great Depression. Factories and workers were needed to produce goods to win the war.
  • More than 125,000 African Americans fought for the United States.
  • The Tuskegee Airmen and other units became famous for their valor and skill.
  • Thousands of American women (e.g., Rosie the Riveter) took jobs in defense plants during the war.
  • African American men and women worked in the industries that supported the Allied war effort.
  • Americans at home supported the war by conserving and rationing resources (e.g., victory gardens, ration books, scrap drives).
  • The need for workers temporarily broke down some racial barriers (e.g., hiring in defense plants), although discrimination against African Americans continued.
  • The service of African Americans in the war, especially against the racist Nazis, encouraged them to press for their rights in the United States.
  • While many Japanese Americans served in the armed forces, others were treated with distrust and prejudice, and more than one hundred thousand were forced into internment camps in the United States.
  • Despite their commitment and service, African Americans remained segregated in the armed forces until President Harry Truman desegregated the armed forces in 1948 during the Korean Conflict.
  •  

African Americans in WWI

  • The 369th Infantry Regiment, formerly known as the 15th New York National Guard Regiment ("Harlem Hellfighters") distinguished themselves during the war.
  • WWI was the first war in which the U.S. Navy was
  • Segregated (African American men relegated to corpsmen or messmen).

 

VDOE US.II 6b

Reforms in the early twentieth century could not legislate how all people behaved.

Economic conditions and violence led to the migration of people.

 

VDOE USII.6d

The optimism of the 1920s concealed problems in the American economic system and attitudes about the role of government in controlling the economy.

The Great Depression and the New Deal dramatically changed the lives of most Americans and began to change both their understanding of the economic system and the role of government in American life.

 

VDOE USII.7ab

Political and economic conditions in Europe following World War I led to the rise of fascism and to World War

 

The Holocaust is an example of prejudice, discrimination, and genocide that targeted Jews and other groups.

 

VDOE USII.7c

World War II affected every aspect of American life.

Americans were asked to make sacrifices in support of the war effort and the ideals for which Americans fought.

 

 

VDOE SOL US II. 1c

Essential Understandings

Interpreting involves using information found in charts, graphs, and pictures to develop an understanding of people, places, or events and draw conclusions.

Close examination and interpretation of various data and images are essential to making informed decisions.

 

  • Discuss the potential bias the photographs might cause.

 

SOL US II.1d

Experiences may include but are not limited to the following:

  • Evaluate media and images as sources for drawing conclusions and making generalizations.
  • Draw conclusions about propaganda used during a selected time period.
  • Make generalizations using political cartoons to explain historical events.
  • After reading about an historical event, use a chart to draw conclusions or make generalizations about a point of view.
  •  
  • SOL US II. 1h
  • Essential Understandings
  • Decisions concerning the allocation and use of economic resources affect individuals and groups.  Critical examination and evaluation of data is essential to drawing conclusions.  The decision-making process involves seeing the problem from a variety of perspectives and considering the consequences.
  • Decision-making models serve several purposes. They can help us 
  • make decisions for the future
  • better understand the choices people faced in the past
  • Analyze the outcomes of the decisions that people already made.
  • Choices are based upon alternatives that seem to be the best because they involve the least cost and the greatest benefit.
  •  

Instructor Directions:  

The teacher may choose to do this activity using Jamboard, or as a hands-on activity. If the former, the teacher needs to create a copy for each student or group, giving them editor privileges.   If the latter, the teacher should use the instructions and materials provided in the World Wars Venn Powerpoint (attached) (the teacher may wish to print the images and word strips and laminate them for repeated use.).  A Key to the Venn Diagram (attached) is included for the teacher’s use.

This review activity has students focus on the differences and similarities between the two World Wars.  They are provided words and phrases which reflect causes, effects and events of World War I and II, and must determine where these should be placed in the Venn diagram.

 

 

Hands-on format Activity (also see PPTX file attached)

 

Digital format Jamboard (also see PDF attached):

 

 

 

 

 

 

STUDENT PAGE

 

Directions: 

 

This is a review and reflection activity. 

 

For the hands-on version: Using the provided materials, complete the Venn sorting activity in a group or individually.

 

For the digital Jamboard: Drag and drop the concepts in its proper category in the Venn diagram

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   By the Dr. Carter G. Woodson Collaborative, 2021