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African American Women Unite for Change (Teaching with Historic Places) (U.S. National Park Service)
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
Rating

As a historic unit of the National Park Service, the Mary McLeod Bethune Council House is listed in the National Register of Historic Places. The site also is within the boundaries of the Logan Circle Historic District. This lesson is based on the Historic Resources Study for Mary McLeod Bethune Council House National Historic Site, as well as other materials on Bethune and the National Council of Negro Women. The lesson was written by Brenda K. Olio, former Teaching with Historic Places historian, and edited by staff of the Teaching with Historic Places program and Mary McLeod Bethune Council House National Historic Site.

Subject:
American History
Geography
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
National Park Service
Author:
Brenda K. Olio
Date Added:
07/06/2022
Agricultural Trends in America Part 1
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

First of two lessons on agriculatural tends in America. This one looks at the number of farms, average farm size, and amount of land in farms from 1850 through 2012.

Subject:
History/Social Sciences
Geography
Material Type:
Interactive
Lesson Plan
Visual Media
Provider:
Virginia Geographic Alliance
Provider Set:
2018 AP Human Geography Academy-Changing Patterns of Agriculture
Author:
Kameron
Schaefer
Date Added:
08/14/2018
Agricultural Trends in America Part 2
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

Second of two lessons on agriculatural tends in America. This one uses ArcGIS online that follows simple step-by-step directions to create a web map. Students will learn how farm size, average farm output, and type of farming vary across the U.S.

Subject:
History/Social Sciences
Geography
Material Type:
Interactive
Lesson Plan
Visual Media
Provider:
Virginia Geographic Alliance
Provider Set:
2018 AP Human Geography Academy-Changing Patterns of Agriculture
Author:
Kameron
Schaefer
Date Added:
08/14/2018
Alcatraz Island
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
Rating

Alcatraz is home to one of the world's most infamous prisons. From the 1930s to 1960s, Alcatraz was the premier maximum security prison, housing inmates such as Al Capone and George Machine Gun Kelly. Before the prison was created, the island was home to American Indians. Today, it is one of San Francisco's most prominent tourist attractions.

Subject:
American History
Geography
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
National Park Service
Date Added:
07/15/2003
American Southwest
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
Rating

presents a travel itinerary of 58 historic places across Arizona, Colorado, and New Mexico. It includes forts built to protect mail routes and settlers, missions and churches, prehistoric cliff dwellings, trading posts, petroglyphs (from the petrified forest), pit house villages, and Indian villages home to the Anasazi, Sinagua, Zuni, and other Native American tribes.

Subject:
American History
Geography
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
National Park Service
Provider Set:
National Register of Historic Places
Date Added:
02/25/2004
Ancient Greece: Analyzing the Geography of Ancient Greece
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

In the second lesson of four on Ancient Greece, students refine their knowledge of physical features as they investigate pictures of Greece and determine how a particular physical feature influenced human action. Key question: How did the physical geography of the Aegean basin shape the economic, social and political development of Greek civilization?

Subject:
History/Social Sciences
Geography
World History
Material Type:
Lesson
Visual Media
Provider:
Virginia Geographic Alliance
Provider Set:
World History and Geography to 1500 A.D. (C.E.) Class Lessons
Author:
Barbara
Castelo
Crain
Donald J.
Enedy
Georgeanne
Hribar
Joseph D.
Mills
Rebecca
Shannon
Zeigler
Date Added:
08/14/2012
Ancient Greece: Locating Ancient Greece
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

In the first lesson of four on Ancient Greece, students use geographic terms such as hemispheres, continents, and direction to describe the relative location of Greece within the world, within Europe, and within the Aegean Basin. In addition, students extend and refine their ability to identify various types of physical features on maps at a variety of scales. Students examine maps to identify and describe the physical environment of Greece. Key questions: Where is ancient Greece located?; What are physical features of the Aegean Basin?; How did the location of Greece and its physical environment influence its interaction with the rest of the world?

Subject:
History/Social Sciences
Geography
World History
Material Type:
Lesson
Visual Media
Provider:
Virginia Geographic Alliance
Provider Set:
World History and Geography to 1500 A.D. (C.E.) Class Lessons
Author:
Barbara
Castelo
Crain
Donald J.
Enedy
Georgeanne
Hribar
Joseph D.
Mills
Rebecca
Shannon
Zeigler
Date Added:
08/14/2012
Ancient Greece: Simulating Trade in Ancient Greece
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

In the third lesson of four on Ancient Greece, students simulate trade between Greek city states and their colonies. The overall goal is for the Greek traders and colonists to travel to new territories, trade resources, and as a result build an empire and spread Hellenistic culture. Through the examination of the goods exchanged, students gain a basic understanding of specialization in the various areas of the Mediterranean Basin. Key questions: Why did the Greeks acquire colonies?; How did Greek culture diffuse throughout the Mediterranean world?; What were the effects of the diffusion of Greek culture?

Subject:
History/Social Sciences
Geography
World History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Visual Media
Provider:
Virginia Geographic Alliance
Provider Set:
World History and Geography to 1500 A.D. (C.E.) Class Lessons
Author:
Barbara
Castelo
Crain
Donald J.
Enedy
Georgeanne
Hribar
Joseph D.
Mills
Rebecca
Shannon
Zeigler
Date Added:
08/14/2012
Ancient Greece: Visualizing the Geographic Extent of Alexander’s Empire
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

In the last lesson of four on Ancient Greece, students employ spatial thinking to understand the extent of the empire of Alexander the Great by examining and comparing visuals and maps. Key question: How does the geographic extent of an empire influence its ability to exist through time?

Subject:
History/Social Sciences
Geography
World History
Material Type:
Lesson
Visual Media
Provider:
Virginia Geographic Alliance
Provider Set:
World History and Geography to 1500 A.D. (C.E.) Class Lessons
Author:
Barbara
Castelo
Crain
Donald J.
Enedy
Georgeanne
Hribar
Joseph D.
Mills
Rebecca
Shannon
Zeigler
Date Added:
08/14/2012
Ancient River Valley Civilizations: Evaluating the Location of Ancient River Valley Civilizations
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

In the first of two lessons on ancient river valley civilization, students examine the physical environment of the early river valley civilizations. After identifying the locations of the ancient civilizations, students complete a feature analysis to assist them in comparing the physical environments and determining how it afforded protection to the civilizations. Key questions: Why was a river valley a good place for a settlement? What was the significance of these river valley civilizations?

Subject:
History/Social Sciences
Geography
World History
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Lesson
Visual Media
Provider:
Virginia Geographic Alliance
Provider Set:
World History and Geography to 1500 A.D. (C.E.) Class Lessons
Author:
Barbara
Castelo
Crain
Donald J.
Enedy
Georgeanne
Hribar
Joseph D.
Mills
Rebecca
Shannon
Zeigler
Date Added:
08/14/2012
Ancient River Valley Civilizations: Why Does Sedimentation Matter?
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

In the second of two lessons on ancient river valley civilizations, students examine the physical environment of the early river valley civilizations. Moving water carries and sorts sediment, changes landforms, and creates strata. The sediment becomes the base for soil formation, and it is the material of which flood plains, deltas, and natural levees are built. Through a demonstration of the sedimentation process, students will come to understand the significance of the process and seasonal flooding to agricultural activity in the early river valley civilizations. Key questions: How does the process of sedimentation affect soil fertility? Why are some river valleys good sites for human settlement?

Subject:
History/Social Sciences
Geography
World History
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Lesson
Visual Media
Provider:
Virginia Geographic Alliance
Provider Set:
World History and Geography to 1500 A.D. (C.E.) Class Lessons
Author:
Barbara
Castelo
Crain
Donald J.
Enedy
Georgeanne
Hribar
Joseph D.
Mills
Rebecca
Shannon
Zeigler
Date Added:
08/14/2012
Ancient Rome from 700 B.C. to 500 A.D. (C.E.): Analyzing the Influence of Geography on the Spread of the Roman Empire
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

The first lesson of two on Ancient Rome, students examine physical maps of Rome to identify physical features that provided security for the site of Rome. In addition, students examine the relative location of Rome and its connections within the Mediterranean Basin and beyond. The second segment of the lesson examines the expansion of the Roman Empire through time and the role of physical features in facilitating or hindering that expansion. Key questions: What are the physical features of Rome?;
How did the physical geography of Rome influence its development?

Subject:
History/Social Sciences
Geography
World History
Material Type:
Interactive
Lesson
Visual Media
Provider:
Virginia Geographic Alliance
Provider Set:
World History and Geography to 1500 A.D. (C.E.) Class Lessons
Author:
Barbara
Castelo
Crain
Donald J.
Enedy
Georgeanne
Hribar
Joseph D.
Mills
Rebecca
Shannon
Zeigler
Date Added:
08/14/2012
Ancient Rome from 700 B.C. to 500 A.D. (C.E.): Investigating Time and Distance in the Roman Empire
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

The second lesson of two on Ancient Rome, students examine the geographic extent of the Roman Empire. The Orbis Web site, hosted by Stanford University, provides a map of the Roman Empire at its largest extent with the locations of key cities and transportation links. Key questions: How were places within the Roman Empire connected?; How did time and distance affect interactions within the Roman Empire?

Subject:
History/Social Sciences
Geography
World History
Material Type:
Interactive
Lesson
Visual Media
Provider:
Virginia Geographic Alliance
Provider Set:
World History and Geography to 1500 A.D. (C.E.) Class Lessons
Author:
Barbara
Castelo
Crain
Donald J.
Enedy
Georgeanne
Hribar
Joseph D.
Mills
Rebecca
Shannon
Zeigler
Date Added:
08/14/2012
Archeology for Interpreters, A Guide to the Knowledge of the Resource
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
Rating

Help students learn about archaeological methods and how archaeological interpretations are made. It is organized around questions that include: What is archeology? What do archaeologists do? How do archaeologists determine how old things are?

Subject:
American History
Geography
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
National Park Service
Provider Set:
National Register of Historic Places
Date Added:
07/08/2003
At Home With Ursula Le Guin
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

At Home With Ursula Le Guin; Her novels featured dragons and wizards, but they were also deeply grounded in indigenous American ways of thought.

Subject:
History/Social Sciences
American History
Geography
Government and Civics
Social Sciences
Material Type:
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Visual Media
Provider:
New American History
Provider Set:
Bunk
Author:
Breen, Benjamin
Date Added:
08/06/2018
Beyond Population - Using Different Types of Density to Understand Land Use
Rating

Students will use images, U.S. Census Bureau data, and interactive maps to visualize and calculate arithmetic (population), agricultural, and physiological densities at local, regional, and national scales. They will also transfer their calculations to bar graphs.

Subject:
Cross-Curricular
History/Social Sciences
Geography
Mathematics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
U.S. Census Bureau
Provider Set:
Statistics in Schools
Date Added:
01/06/2020