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Aesop and Ananse: Animal Fables and Trickster Tales
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In this unit, students will become familiar with fables and trickster tales from different cultural traditions and will see how stories change when transferred orally between generations and cultures. They will learn how both types of folktales employ various animals in different ways to portray human strengths and weaknesses and to pass down wisdom from one generation to the next. Use the following lessons to introduce students to world folklore and to explore how folktales convey the perspectives of different world cultures.

Subject:
Cross-Curricular
English
Fiction
History/Social Sciences
World History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Unit of Study
Provider:
National Endowment for the Humanities
Provider Set:
EDSITEments
Author:
Individual Authors
Date Added:
10/22/2019
American Diplomacy in World War II
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This four-lesson curriculum unit will examine the nature of what Winston Churchill called the "Grand Alliance" between the United States, Great Britain, and the Soviet Union in opposition to the aggression of Nazi Germany and Imperial Japan.

Subject:
History/Social Sciences
World History
Material Type:
Lesson
Provider:
National Endowment for the Humanities
Provider Set:
EDSITEments
Date Added:
10/22/2019
Ancient Greece: Analyzing the Geography of Ancient Greece
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In the second lesson of four on Ancient Greece, students refine their knowledge of physical features as they investigate pictures of Greece and determine how a particular physical feature influenced human action. Key question: How did the physical geography of the Aegean basin shape the economic, social and political development of Greek civilization?

Subject:
History/Social Sciences
Geography
World History
Material Type:
Lesson
Visual Media
Provider:
Virginia Geographic Alliance
Provider Set:
World History and Geography to 1500 A.D. (C.E.) Class Lessons
Author:
Barbara
Castelo
Crain
Donald J.
Enedy
Georgeanne
Hribar
Joseph D.
Mills
Rebecca
Shannon
Zeigler
Date Added:
08/14/2012
Ancient Greece: Locating Ancient Greece
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In the first lesson of four on Ancient Greece, students use geographic terms such as hemispheres, continents, and direction to describe the relative location of Greece within the world, within Europe, and within the Aegean Basin. In addition, students extend and refine their ability to identify various types of physical features on maps at a variety of scales. Students examine maps to identify and describe the physical environment of Greece. Key questions: Where is ancient Greece located?; What are physical features of the Aegean Basin?; How did the location of Greece and its physical environment influence its interaction with the rest of the world?

Subject:
History/Social Sciences
Geography
World History
Material Type:
Lesson
Visual Media
Provider:
Virginia Geographic Alliance
Provider Set:
World History and Geography to 1500 A.D. (C.E.) Class Lessons
Author:
Barbara
Castelo
Crain
Donald J.
Enedy
Georgeanne
Hribar
Joseph D.
Mills
Rebecca
Shannon
Zeigler
Date Added:
08/14/2012
Ancient Greece: Simulating Trade in Ancient Greece
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In the third lesson of four on Ancient Greece, students simulate trade between Greek city states and their colonies. The overall goal is for the Greek traders and colonists to travel to new territories, trade resources, and as a result build an empire and spread Hellenistic culture. Through the examination of the goods exchanged, students gain a basic understanding of specialization in the various areas of the Mediterranean Basin. Key questions: Why did the Greeks acquire colonies?; How did Greek culture diffuse throughout the Mediterranean world?; What were the effects of the diffusion of Greek culture?

Subject:
History/Social Sciences
Geography
World History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Visual Media
Provider:
Virginia Geographic Alliance
Provider Set:
World History and Geography to 1500 A.D. (C.E.) Class Lessons
Author:
Barbara
Castelo
Crain
Donald J.
Enedy
Georgeanne
Hribar
Joseph D.
Mills
Rebecca
Shannon
Zeigler
Date Added:
08/14/2012
Ancient Greece: Visualizing the Geographic Extent of Alexander’s Empire
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In the last lesson of four on Ancient Greece, students employ spatial thinking to understand the extent of the empire of Alexander the Great by examining and comparing visuals and maps. Key question: How does the geographic extent of an empire influence its ability to exist through time?

Subject:
History/Social Sciences
Geography
World History
Material Type:
Lesson
Visual Media
Provider:
Virginia Geographic Alliance
Provider Set:
World History and Geography to 1500 A.D. (C.E.) Class Lessons
Author:
Barbara
Castelo
Crain
Donald J.
Enedy
Georgeanne
Hribar
Joseph D.
Mills
Rebecca
Shannon
Zeigler
Date Added:
08/14/2012
Ancient River Valley Civilizations: Evaluating the Location of Ancient River Valley Civilizations
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In the first of two lessons on ancient river valley civilization, students examine the physical environment of the early river valley civilizations. After identifying the locations of the ancient civilizations, students complete a feature analysis to assist them in comparing the physical environments and determining how it afforded protection to the civilizations. Key questions: Why was a river valley a good place for a settlement? What was the significance of these river valley civilizations?

Subject:
History/Social Sciences
Geography
World History
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Lesson
Visual Media
Provider:
Virginia Geographic Alliance
Provider Set:
World History and Geography to 1500 A.D. (C.E.) Class Lessons
Author:
Barbara
Castelo
Crain
Donald J.
Enedy
Georgeanne
Hribar
Joseph D.
Mills
Rebecca
Shannon
Zeigler
Date Added:
08/14/2012
Ancient River Valley Civilizations: Why Does Sedimentation Matter?
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In the second of two lessons on ancient river valley civilizations, students examine the physical environment of the early river valley civilizations. Moving water carries and sorts sediment, changes landforms, and creates strata. The sediment becomes the base for soil formation, and it is the material of which flood plains, deltas, and natural levees are built. Through a demonstration of the sedimentation process, students will come to understand the significance of the process and seasonal flooding to agricultural activity in the early river valley civilizations. Key questions: How does the process of sedimentation affect soil fertility? Why are some river valleys good sites for human settlement?

Subject:
History/Social Sciences
Geography
World History
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Lesson
Visual Media
Provider:
Virginia Geographic Alliance
Provider Set:
World History and Geography to 1500 A.D. (C.E.) Class Lessons
Author:
Barbara
Castelo
Crain
Donald J.
Enedy
Georgeanne
Hribar
Joseph D.
Mills
Rebecca
Shannon
Zeigler
Date Added:
08/14/2012
Ancient Rome from 700 B.C. to 500 A.D. (C.E.): Analyzing the Influence of Geography on the Spread of the Roman Empire
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Rating

The first lesson of two on Ancient Rome, students examine physical maps of Rome to identify physical features that provided security for the site of Rome. In addition, students examine the relative location of Rome and its connections within the Mediterranean Basin and beyond. The second segment of the lesson examines the expansion of the Roman Empire through time and the role of physical features in facilitating or hindering that expansion. Key questions: What are the physical features of Rome?;
How did the physical geography of Rome influence its development?

Subject:
History/Social Sciences
Geography
World History
Material Type:
Interactive
Lesson
Visual Media
Provider:
Virginia Geographic Alliance
Provider Set:
World History and Geography to 1500 A.D. (C.E.) Class Lessons
Author:
Barbara
Castelo
Crain
Donald J.
Enedy
Georgeanne
Hribar
Joseph D.
Mills
Rebecca
Shannon
Zeigler
Date Added:
08/14/2012
Ancient Rome from 700 B.C. to 500 A.D. (C.E.): Investigating Time and Distance in the Roman Empire
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The second lesson of two on Ancient Rome, students examine the geographic extent of the Roman Empire. The Orbis Web site, hosted by Stanford University, provides a map of the Roman Empire at its largest extent with the locations of key cities and transportation links. Key questions: How were places within the Roman Empire connected?; How did time and distance affect interactions within the Roman Empire?

Subject:
History/Social Sciences
Geography
World History
Material Type:
Interactive
Lesson
Visual Media
Provider:
Virginia Geographic Alliance
Provider Set:
World History and Geography to 1500 A.D. (C.E.) Class Lessons
Author:
Barbara
Castelo
Crain
Donald J.
Enedy
Georgeanne
Hribar
Joseph D.
Mills
Rebecca
Shannon
Zeigler
Date Added:
08/14/2012
Animals of the Chinese Zodiac
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In this lesson plan, students will learn about the 12 animals of the Chinese zodiac. In the introductory first lesson, they will see how animals are often used as symbols. In the second lesson, they will hear one of several versions of how the 12 animals were chosen. They will then focus upon a few of the animals in the story and see how they can be used as symbols of certain human characteristics. In the third lesson, they will be introduced to the other animals of the zodiac, and they will be given a chart on which they will assign traits to each animal. Then they will consult a number of websites to find the traits traditionally associated with the animals, which they will add to their list. Then, they will come up with a number of ways to compare and contrast the animals in the list. In the third lesson, they will focus upon the animal associated with the year of their birth, learning about its traits and discussing whether or not these apply to themselves and their peers. Finally, each student will make an acrostic, combining the letters of his or her first name with adjectives that relate to his or her zodiac sign.

Subject:
Cross-Curricular
English
Fiction
History/Social Sciences
World History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Homework/Assignment
Lesson Plan
Provider:
National Endowment for the Humanities
Provider Set:
EDSITEments
Date Added:
10/22/2019
Anne Frank: One of Hundreds of Thousands
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Drawing upon the online archives of the U.S. Holocaust Museum, this lesson helps students to put the events described by Anne Frank into historical perspective, and also serves as a broad overview of the Nazi conquest of Europe during World War II. After surveying the experiences of various countries under Nazi occupation, the lesson ends with activities related specifically to the Netherlands and Anne Frank.

Subject:
Cross-Curricular
English
Fiction
History/Social Sciences
World History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
National Endowment for the Humanities
Provider Set:
EDSITEments
Date Added:
10/22/2019
Arabic Poetry: Guzzle a Ghazal!
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The Bedouins of ancient Arabia and Persia made poetry a conversational art form. Several poetic forms developed from the participatory nature of tribal poetry. Today in most Arabic cultures, you may still experience public storytelling and spontaneous poetry challenges in the streets. The art of turning a rhyme into sly verbal sparring is considered a mark of intelligence and a badge of honor. Students will learn about the origins and structure of Arabic Poetry.

Subject:
Cross-Curricular
English
Fiction
History/Social Sciences
World History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Reading
Provider:
National Endowment for the Humanities
Provider Set:
EDSITEments
Author:
Individual Authors
Date Added:
10/22/2019
Asia in the Modern World: Images & Representations
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Rating

We will explore images that pertain to the emergence of Japan as a modern state. We will focus on images that depict Japan as it comes into contact with the rest of the world after its long and deep isolation during the feudal period. We will also cover city planning of Tokyo that took place after WWII, and such topics as the 1964 Tokyo Olympics.

Subject:
History/Social Sciences
World History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
High School Highlights
Author:
Shigeru Miyagawa
Date Added:
10/22/2019
Asian American & Pacific Islander Perspectives within Humanities Education
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Organized around the compelling question "How have Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders engaged civically and contributed to U.S. culture?" and grounded in inquiry-based teaching and learning, this lesson brings history, civics, and the arts together to learn about the experiences and perspectives of Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (AAPI) in U.S. history. Primary sources, literature, and works of art created by AAPI individuals and related organizations provide an historical as well as contemporary context for concepts and issues including civic participation, immigration, and culture.

Subject:
History/Social Sciences
World History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
National Endowment for the Humanities
Provider Set:
EDSITEments
Date Added:
10/22/2019
Asian Empires Round Robin (Gunpowder Empires)
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This is a Round Robin review game for World History II SOL 6. It covers the empires of Ottomans, Safavids, Mughals, China & Japan. This assignment template could be easily adapted for a review for another set of content material. *Also known as "I have, who has".

Subject:
World History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
Crystal DeLong
Date Added:
12/20/2019
Asian and African Empires, 1500s-1800s
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This unit is intended to address the VA Standards of Learning for World History II Standards 6 and 7.  Students are required to explore the similarities and differences between the various Asian land empires and African societies of the 1500s-1800s, with a particular focus on geographic, political, cultural, and economic interactions with each other and the rest of the world. Through the unit, students practice information literacy skills as they research and become experts in one Asian or African empire, work with a group to develop a virtual museum exhibit on it, and explore the virtual museum exhibits created by the other groups to learn about all of the empires and synthesize the unit content.  The unit, which is separated into 6 modules,  was designed for use in a virtual learning environment with both synchronous and asynchronous components.  It could easily be converted to a fully face-to-face unit, but it would be challenging to convert it to a fully asynchronous online unit because of the group work activities involved. 

Subject:
World History
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Author:
Bridget Mariano
Jennifer Clements
Date Added:
09/30/2020
Australian Aboriginal Art and Storytelling
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Rating

Australian Aboriginal art is one of the oldest continuing art traditions in the world. Much of the most important knowledge of aboriginal society was conveyed through different kinds of storytelling—including narratives that were spoken, performed as dances or songs, and those that were painted. In this lesson students will learn about the Aboriginal storytelling tradition through the spoken word and through visual culture. They will have the opportunity to hear stories of the Dreamtime told by the Aboriginal people, as well as to investigate Aboriginal storytelling in contemporary dot paintings.

Subject:
Cross-Curricular
English
Fiction
History/Social Sciences
World History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Lesson Plan
Provider:
National Endowment for the Humanities
Provider Set:
EDSITEments
Author:
Individual Authors
Date Added:
10/22/2019
The Aztecs: Mighty Warriors of Mexico
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The Aztec capital of Tenochtitlan was the hub of a rich civilization that dominated the region of modern-day Mexico at the time the Spanish forces arrived. In this lesson, students will learn about the history and culture of the Aztecs and discover why their civilization came to an abrupt end.

Subject:
History/Social Sciences
World History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
National Endowment for the Humanities
Provider Set:
EDSITEments
Date Added:
10/22/2019
Remix
The Bart
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The Egyptian Barter Game is a lesson designed to get students active in the classroom while learning about Egyptian culture and the barter system. It is a card game (using homemade cards and other materials) which should be played more than once so students can consider their strategies used to barter their "haves" for their "needs." It should not be students' first introduction to Egyptian culture but should come after some exposure to what life was like in ancient Egypt. Addresses Virginia SOL: HSS.2.9, HSS.3.2, HSS.3.8, HSS.3.9

Subject:
Economics
World History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Game
Author:
Matthew Fuquay
Date Added:
08/21/2019