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6.2 Thermal Energy - Unit Overview
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This unit on thermal energy transfer begins with students testing whether a new plastic cup sold by a store keeps a drink colder for longer compared to the regular plastic cup that comes free with the drink. Students find that the drink in the regular cup warms up more than the drink in the special cup. This prompts students to identify features of the cups that are different, such as the lid, walls, and hole for the straw, that might explain why one drink warms up more than the other.

Students investigate the different cup features they conjecture are important to explaining the phenomenon, starting with the lid. They model how matter can enter or exit the cup via evaporation However, they find that in a completely closed system, the liquid inside the cup still changes temperature. This motivates the need to trace the transfer of energy into the drink as it warms up. Through a series of lab investigations and simulations, students find that there are two ways to transfer energy into the drink: (1) the absorption of light and (2) thermal energy from the warmer air around the drink. They are then challenged to design their own drink container that can perform as well as the store-bought container, following a set of design criteria and constraints.

See the OpenSciEd Instructional Model also: https://www.openscied.org/openscied-instructional-model/

Subject:
Science
Force/Motion/Energy
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
OpenSciEd
Date Added:
03/20/2020
6.3 Weather, Climate & Water Cycling - Unit Overview
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This unit on weather, climate, and water cycling is broken into four separate lesson sets. In the first two lesson sets, students explain small-scale storms. In the third and fourth lesson sets, students explain mesoscale weather systems and climate-level patterns of precipitation. Each of these two parts of the unit is grounded in a different anchoring phenomenon.

The unit starts out with anchoring students in the exploration of a series of videos of hailstorms from different locations across the country at different times of the year. The videos show that pieces of ice of different sizes (some very large) are falling out of the sky, sometimes accompanied by rain and wind gusts, all on days when the temperature of the air outside remained above freezing for the entire day. These cases spark questions and ideas for investigations, such as investigating how ice can be falling from the sky on a warm day, how clouds form, why some clouds produce storms with large amounts of precipitation and others don?t, and how all that water gets into the air in the first place.

The second half of the unit is anchored in the exploration of a weather report of a winter storm that affected large portions of the midwestern United States. The maps, transcripts, and video that students analyze show them that the storm was forecasted to produce large amounts of snow and ice accumulation in large portions of the northeastern part of the country within the next day. This case sparks questions and ideas for investigations around trying to figure out what could be causing such a large-scale storm and why it would end up affecting a different part of the country a day later.

See the OpenSciEd Instructional Model also: https://www.openscied.org/openscied-instructional-model/

Subject:
Science
Earth and Space Systems
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
OpenSciEd
Date Added:
03/20/2020
7.3 Metabolic Reactions - Unit Overview
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This unit on metabolic reactions in the human body starts out with students exploring a real case study of a middle-school girl named M?Kenna, who reported some alarming symptoms to her doctor. Her symptoms included an inability to concentrate, headaches, stomach issues when she eats, and a lack of energy for everyday activities and sports that she used to play regularly. She also reported noticeable weight loss over the past few months, in spite of consuming what appeared to be a healthy diet. Her case sparks questions and ideas for investigations around trying to figure out which pathways and processes in M?Kenna?s body might be functioning differently than a healthy system and why.

Students investigate data specific to M?Kenna?s case in the form of doctor?s notes, endoscopy images and reports, growth charts, and micrographs. They also draw from their results from laboratory experiments on the chemical changes involving the processing of food and from digital interactives to explore how food is transported, transformed, stored, and used across different body systems in all people. Through this work of figuring out what is causing M?Kenna?s symptoms, the class discovers what happens to the food we eat after it enters our bodies and how M?Kenna?s different symptoms are connected.

See the OpenSciEd Instructional Model also: https://www.openscied.org/openscied-instructional-model/

Subject:
Science
Living Systems and Processes
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
OpenSciEd
Date Added:
03/20/2020
7.4 Matter Cycling & Photosynthesis - Unit Overview
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This unit on matter cycling and photosynthesis begins with students reflecting on what they ate for breakfast. Students are prompted to consider where their food comes from and consider which breakfast items might be from plants. Then students taste a common breakfast food, maple syrup, and see that according to the label, it is 100% from a tree.

Based on the preceding unit, students argue that they know what happens to the sugar in syrup when they consume it. It is absorbed into the circulatory system and transported to cells in their body to be used for fuel. Students explore what else is in food and discover that food from plants, like bananas, peanut butter, beans, avocado, and almonds, not only have sugars but proteins and fats as well. This discovery leads them to wonder how plants are getting these food molecules and where a plant?s food comes from.

Students figure out that they can trace all food back to plants, including processed and synthetic food. They obtain and communicate information to explain how matter gets from living things that have died back into the system through processes done by decomposers. Students finally explain that the pieces of their food are constantly recycled between living and nonliving parts of a system.

See the OpenSciEd Instructional Model also: https://www.openscied.org/openscied-instructional-model/

Subject:
Science
Living Systems and Processes
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
OpenSciEd
Date Added:
03/20/2020
8.2 Sound Waves - Unit Overview
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In this unit, students develop ideas related to how sounds are produced, how they travel through media, and how they affect objects at a distance. Their investigations are motivated by trying to account for a perplexing anchoring phenomenon ? a truck is playing loud music in a parking lot and the windows of a building across the parking lot visibly shake in response to the music.

They make observations of sound sources to revisit the K?5 idea that objects vibrate when they make sounds. They figure out that patterns of differences in those vibrations are tied to differences in characteristics of the sounds being made. They gather data on how objects vibrate when making different sounds to characterize how a vibrating object?s motion is tied to the loudness and pitch of the sounds they make. Students also conduct experiments to support the idea that sound needs matter to travel through, and they will use models and simulations to explain how sound travels through matter at the particle level.

See the OpenSciEd Instructional Model also: https://www.openscied.org/openscied-instructional-model/

Subject:
Science
Force/Motion/Energy
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
OpenSciEd
Date Added:
03/20/2020
8.3 Forces at a Distance - Unit Overview
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This unit launches with a slow-motion video of a speaker as it plays music. In the previous unit, students developed a model of sound. This unit allows students to investigate the cause of a speaker?s vibration in addition to the effect.

Students dissect speakers to explore the inner workings, and engineer homemade cup speakers to manipulate the parts of the speaker. They identify that most speakers have the same parts?a magnet, a coil of wire, and a membrane. Students investigate each of these parts to figure out how they work together in the speaker system. Along the way, students manipulate the components (e.g. changing the strength of the magnet, number of coils, direction of current) to see how this technology can be modified and applied to a variety of contexts, like MagLev trains, junkyard magnets, and electric motors.

See the OpenSciEd Instructional Model also: https://www.openscied.org/openscied-instructional-model/

Subject:
Science
Force/Motion/Energy
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
OpenSciEd
Date Added:
03/20/2020
Across the Wide Dark Sea
Conditions of Use:
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A boy and his family endure a difficult nine-week journey across the ocean and survive the first winter at Plymouth. Based on true events, "Across the Wide Dark Sea" poetically narrates a young boy's account of risking the ocean to find religious freedom in a new land.

Subject:
English
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Unit of Study
Provider:
Basal Alignment Project
Provider Set:
Washoe District
Author:
Jean Van Leeuwen
Date Added:
09/01/2013
Activism in the US
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

The United States has a long history of activists seeking social, political, economic, and other changes to America—along with a history of other activists trying to prevent such changes. American activism covered a wide range of causes and utilized many different forms of activism. American sociopolitical activism became especially prominent during the period of societal upheaval which began during the 1950s. The African American civil rights movement led the way, soon followed by a substantial anti-war movement opposing American involvement in the Vietnam War, and later by vigorous activism involving women’s issues, gay rights, and other causes. The United States remains a land of nearly constant change, and activists play a significant role in the ongoing evolution of American democracy. It seems likely that Americans will remain enthusiastic activists in the future. This exhibition is part of the Digital Library of Georgia.

Subject:
History/Social Sciences
American History
Government and Civics
Material Type:
Primary Source
Unit of Study
Visual Media
Provider:
Digital Public Library of America
Date Added:
04/01/2013
The Adventurers
Conditions of Use:
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This selection is an informational narrative in the form of a play or Readers' Theater. The play is about a group of boys and girls who are summertime campers at the National Sea Base camp in the Florida Keys. Their adventure includes camping, snorkeling, and sailing aboard the ship. This is a new adventure for the characters in this story.

Subject:
English
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Unit of Study
Provider:
Basal Alignment Project
Provider Set:
Columbus District
Author:
Author Unknown
Date Added:
09/01/2013
Aero and Officer Mike
Conditions of Use:
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Rating

This nonfiction story is about a partnership between a policeman, Officer Mike, and his partner, a police dog named Aero. Information about daily routine (work and breaks), Aero's special talents and Officer Mike's training and care of Aero is included.

Subject:
English
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Unit of Study
Provider:
Basal Alignment Project
Provider Set:
Tangipahoa Parish District
Author:
Joan Plummer Russell
Date Added:
09/01/2013
Aesop and Ananse: Animal Fables and Trickster Tales
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

In this unit, students will become familiar with fables and trickster tales from different cultural traditions and will see how stories change when transferred orally between generations and cultures. They will learn how both types of folktales employ various animals in different ways to portray human strengths and weaknesses and to pass down wisdom from one generation to the next. Use the following lessons to introduce students to world folklore and to explore how folktales convey the perspectives of different world cultures.

Subject:
Cross-Curricular
English
Fiction
History/Social Sciences
World History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Unit of Study
Provider:
National Endowment for the Humanities
Provider Set:
EDSITEments
Author:
Individual Authors
Date Added:
10/22/2019
Aging Heart Valves
Conditions of Use:
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In this unit, students learn about the form and function of the human heart through lecture, research and dissection. Following the steps of the Legacy Cycle, students brainstorm, research, design and present viable solutions to various heart conditions as presented through a unit challenge. Additionally, students study how heart valves work and investigate how faulty valves can be replaced with new ones through advancements in engineering and technology. This unit demonstrates to students how and why the heart is such a powerful organ in our bodies

Subject:
Scientific and Engineering Practices
Material Type:
Full Course
Unit of Study
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Carleigh Samson
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Air Quality InQuiry (AQ-IQ)
Conditions of Use:
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Rating

Students engage in hands-on, true-to-life research experiences on air quality topics chosen for personal interest through a unit composed of one lesson and five associated activities. Using a project-based learning approach suitable for secondary science classrooms and low-cost air quality monitors, students gain the background and skills needed to conduct their own air quality research projects. The curriculum provides: 1) an introduction to air quality science, 2) data collection practice, 3) data analysis practice, 4) help planning and conducting a research project and 5) guidance in interpreting data and presenting research in professional poster format. The comprehensive curriculum requires no pre-requisite knowledge of air quality science or engineering. This curriculum takes advantage of low-cost, next-generation, open-source air quality monitors called Pods. These monitors were developed in a mechanical engineering lab at the University of Colorado Boulder and are used for academic research as well as education and outreach. The monitors are made available for use with this curriculum through AQ-IQ Kits that may be rented from the university by teachers. Alternatively, nearly the entire unit, including the student-directed projects, could also be completed without an air quality monitor. For example, students can design research projects that utilize existing air quality data instead of collecting their own, which is highly feasible since much data is publically available. In addition, other low-cost monitors could be used instead of the Pods. Also, the curriculum is intentionally flexible, so that the lesson and its activities can be used individually. See the Other section for details about the Pods and ideas for alternative equipment, usage without air quality monitors, and adjustments to individually teach the lesson and activities.

Subject:
Scientific and Engineering Practices
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Ashley Collier
Ben Graves
Daniel Knight
Drew Meyers
Eric Ambos
Eric Lee
Erik Hotaling
Evan Coffey
Hanadi Adel Salamah
Joanna Gordon
Katya Hafich
Michael Hannigan
Nicholas VanderKolk
Olivia Cecil
Victoria Danner
Date Added:
05/16/2019
Akiak
Conditions of Use:
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Rating

Akiak is the story of a dog that desires to win the Iditarod with her owner, Mick. Akiak is injured and is disqualified from finishing the race, but she follows Mich and the team of dogs to the finish line. This lesson provides teachers with support for using text-dependent questions to help students derive big ideas and key understandings while developing vocabulary.

Subject:
English
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Unit of Study
Provider:
Basal Alignment Project
Provider Set:
San Diego District
Author:
Robert J. Blake
Date Added:
06/05/2019
Allie's Basketball Dream
Conditions of Use:
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Rating

Allie has a new basketball. She has a hard time finding someone to play with her because they believe basketball is a boys game. Allie continues to practice and play, despite their opinions.

Subject:
English
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Unit of Study
Provider:
Basal Alignment Project
Provider Set:
Newark District
Author:
Barbara E. Barber
Date Added:
09/01/2013
Amelia and Eleanor Go For a Ride
Conditions of Use:
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This lesson provides teachers with support for using text-dependent questions to help students derive big ideas and key understandings while developing vocabulary from the text Amelia and Eleanor Go for a Ride. Pilot Amelia Earhart and first lady Eleanor Roosevelt are good friends and one night, after dinner at the White House, Amelia then offers to take Eleanor on an unforgettable night flight to Baltimore and back in the Curtis Condor twin-motor airplan. By the time they arrive back in Washington D.C., a group of reporters meets them at the airstrip. Eleanor admits to not flying this time, but has every intention to fly in the near future.

Subject:
English
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Unit of Study
Provider:
Basal Alignment Project
Provider Set:
Cleveland District
Author:
Pam Munoz Ryan
Date Added:
06/05/2019
America during the 1918 Influenza Pandemic
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

In the spring of 1918, the United States was embroiled in World War I, fighting alongside the English, French, and Russians against the Central Powers of Germany and Austria-Hungary. In total, 70 million men were at war on multiple fronts across Europe, Russia, the Middle East, and Northern Africa. The tide was finally turning for the Allies after a crushing offensive by German forces mere weeks earlier. Then, a fierce enemy intervened—an outbreak of influenza that would decimate entire regiments and towns, kill civilians and soldiers alike by the millions, and rapidly become a global pandemic. This disease weakened forces on both sides, changing not only the course of the war but also the economies and population stability of every affected nation. In the long term, this particular outbreak would inspire research on an unprecedented scale and lead to advances in science and medicine, forever altering our understanding of epidemiology. From the spring of 1918 to early 1919, no aspect of life remained untouched by the pandemic for Americans at home and on the front. This exhibition explores the pandemic’s impact on American life.  This exhibition was created as part of the DPLA’s Digital Curation Program by the following students as part of Dr. Joan E. Beaudoin's course "Metadata in Theory and Practice" in the School of Library and Information Science at Wayne State University: Bethany Campbell, Michelle John, Samantha Reid-Goldberg, Anne Sexton, and John Weimer.

Subject:
History/Social Sciences
American History
Material Type:
Primary Source
Unit of Study
Visual Media
Provider:
Digital Public Library of America
Author:
Anne Sexton
Bethany Campbell
John Weimer
Michelle John
Samantha Reid-Goldberg
Date Added:
04/01/2015
American Aviatrixes: Women with Wings
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

Throughout the early twentieth century, women looked to break new ground in ways never before possible, and the sky literally became the limit. As the nation moved into the aviation age, many women saw flying as a way to break out of traditional societal roles. It gave women not just an opportunity for adventure and excitement, but a way to earn a living outside of the home that demanded respect. Aviatrix Ruth Bancroft Law described it, after defeating the cross-country distance record: "There is an indescribable feeling which one experiences in flying; it comes with no other form of sport or navigation. It takes courage and daring; one must be self-possessed, for there are moments when one's wits are tested to the full. Yet there is an exhilaration that compensates for all one's efforts." In this exhibition we explore the early history of aviation and the courageous women who took to the skies—aviatrixes who found freedom, broke new ground, and inspired generations of women along the way. This exhibition was created as part of the DPLA’s Digital Curation Program by the following students as part of Professor Debbie Rabina’s course "Information Services and Sources" in the School of Information and Library Science at Pratt Institute: Megan DeArmond, Diana Moronta, Laurin Paradise.

Subject:
History/Social Sciences
American History
Material Type:
Primary Source
Unit of Study
Visual Media
Provider:
Digital Public Library of America
Author:
Diana Moronta
Megan DeArmond
Date Added:
03/01/2015