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  • Immigration
19th Century Immigration - Causes & Effects
Rating

Students will examine and interpret a population chart published in 1898 depicting changes in the makeup of the United States across time in three categories, "foreign stock," "native stock," and "colored" as well as an 1893 political cartoon about immigration. Students will also explain the causes and effects of population change in the late 19th century.

Subject:
Cross-Curricular
History/Social Sciences
American History
Mathematics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
U.S. Census Bureau
Provider Set:
Statistics in Schools
Date Added:
01/06/2020
Becoming a Citizen of the United States
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

The students will describe the process of becoming a United States citizen and the reason for the writing of the 14th Amendment to the Constitution of the United States. They will understand how American society has become diverse through immigration and naturalization.

Subject:
Government and Civics
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Charles Baumgardner
Date Added:
01/06/2020
Border Walls
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-SA
Rating

This inquiry examines the 20th century history of migration from Mexico to the United States and recent efforts to limit the movement of people across the southern U.S. border. The inquiry takes its inspiration from a 2018 podcast episode by Malcom Gladwell titled, “General Chapman’s Last Stand.” The podcast is part of Gladwell’s Revisionist History series (http://revisionisthistory.com). In the podcast, Gladwell tells the story of General Leonard F. Chapman Jr., Commandant of the Marine Corps during the Vietnam War, who went on to serve as the Commissioner of the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) from 1972 to 1975. Chapman is credited with reforming the INS into a more efficient and effective agency, but Gladwell argues that Chapman’s efforts also led to an unintentional increase in unauthorized immigrants. In 1970, 760,000 Mexican immigrants, or 1.4% of Mexico’s population, lived in the U.S. By 2008, there were 12.7 million Mexican immigrants in the U.S. which amounted to 11% of all people born in Mexico; an increase of almost 800% in less than 30 years. The question of how and why this happened is the central focus of this inquiry.

Subject:
American History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Primary Source
Provider:
New York State Education Department
Provider Set:
C3 Teachers
Date Added:
06/05/2019
C3 Teachers: Immigration Inquiry Remix
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

Students will answer the question: Did the American Dream come true for immigrants who came to New York? Students will analyze primary and secondary sources, synthesize new information, and answer the compelling question using evidence from the lesson.  Students will use interactive simulations, videos, secondary sources, and primary sources as they engage in supporting questions throughout the lesson. By the end of the lesson, students will be able to explain why immigrants chose to emigrate to America, describe the process at Ellis Island, describe life in New York tenements, and explain how immigrants helped shape New York culture.This lesson is adapted from the Immigration Inquiry designed by C3Teachers.org: http://www.c3teachers.org/inquiries/immigration/ 

Subject:
History/Social Sciences
American History
Material Type:
Lesson
Author:
Amy Gaulton
Date Added:
07/15/2020
Common Core Curriculum Grade 2 ELA: Listening and Learning Strand
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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The Listening and Learning Strand consists of a series of read_alouds organized by topics (called domains), many of which are informational in nature. The goal of the Listening and Learning Strand is for students to acquire language competence through listening, specifically building a rich vocabulary, and broad knowledge in history and science by being exposed to carefully selected, sequenced, and coherent read_alouds. The 9 units (or domains) provide lessons (including images and texts), as well as instructional objectives, core vocabulary, and assessment materials. The domain topics include: Fighting for a Cause; Fairy Tales and Tall Tales; Cycles in Nature; Insects; Ancient Greek Civilizations; Greek Myths; Charlotte's Web; and Immigration.

Subject:
Cross-Curricular
English
History/Social Sciences
Science
Material Type:
Reading
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Unit of Study
Visual Media
Provider:
EngageNY
Date Added:
08/09/2019
Everything Your Students Need to Know About Immigration History
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

Teach Immigration History from the University of Texas at Austin explains the important and complicated history of immigration to the United States for general audiences and high school teachers of U.S. history and civics courses.  The backbone of the website is an 80-item chronology of key events, laws, and court rulings that are further explained by a dozen thematic lesson plans on topics such as citizenship, an overview of major laws, gender and immigration, and migration within the Americas.

Subject:
History/Social Sciences
American History
Government and Civics
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
National Endowment for the Humanities
Provider Set:
EDSITEments
Date Added:
10/22/2019
Exploring Immigration
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

In this unit students explore immigration by reading a series of narrative nonfiction and fiction texts that highlight the experiences of early and recent immigrants. In the first part of the unit students are pushed to notice and think about the different reasons people choose to leave their homes and settle in a new community or country. Students will then be pushed to think about the different memories, cultural traits, goods, ideas, languages, and skills that individuals and families bring with them when they move to a new place and how these characteristics enrich the community. While students are exposed to a wide variety of immigrant experiences over the course of the unit, not every experience or feeling about immigration is captured in this unit. Because many of our students are first- or second-generation immigrants, it is crucial to be sensitive to and respect the varying experiences and feelings of our students and families. It is our hope that this unit, in connection with others, will help students build sensitivity and empathy for varying cultures and experiences within the United States.

Subject:
English
Communication and Multimodal Literacy
Fiction
Reading
Writing
Material Type:
Assessment
Homework/Assignment
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Match Fishtank
Provider Set:
Fishtank ELA
Date Added:
01/01/2017
Foreign Born Population/Migration
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

At all points in its history, a significant proportion of the population of the United States had been born in other countries and regions. This being the case, American history can never be understood by just looking within its borders. The culture and politics of the US have always been profoundly shaped by the material and emotional ties many of its residents have had to the places where they were born. This map will allow you to begin to explore those connections at the basic level of demographic statistics.

Subject:
History/Social Sciences
American History
Geography
Government and Civics
Social Sciences
Material Type:
Data Set
Interactive
Visual Media
Provider:
New American History
Provider Set:
American Panorama
Author:
Ayers, Edward L.
Ayers, Nathaniel
Madron, Justin
Nelson, Robert K.
Date Added:
08/06/2015
Hispanic Heritage and History in the United States
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

Since 1988, the U.S. Government has set aside the period from September 15 to October 15 as National Hispanic Heritage Month to honor the many contributions Hispanic Americans have made and continue to make to the United States of America. Our Teacher's Guide brings together resources created during NEH Summer Seminars and Institutes, lesson plans for K-12 classrooms, and think pieces on events and experiences across Hispanic history and heritage.

Subject:
History/Social Sciences
American History
Material Type:
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
National Endowment for the Humanities
Provider Set:
EDSITEments
Date Added:
10/22/2019
How America Thought About Refugees 70 Years Ago
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

How America Thought About Refugees 70 Years Ago; And other gleanings from the 1949 run of the Saturday Evening Post.

Subject:
History/Social Sciences
American History
Geography
Government and Civics
Social Sciences
Material Type:
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Visual Media
Provider:
New American History
Provider Set:
Bunk
Author:
Breen, Benjamin
Date Added:
08/06/2019
Immigration Nation
Rating

Students will examine data on the number of immigrants in the United States, to create bar graphs and line graphs with appropriate scales. Students will then compare and analyze their graphs to draw conclusions about the data.

Subject:
Cross-Curricular
History/Social Sciences
American History
Government and Civics
Mathematics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
U.S. Census Bureau
Provider Set:
Statistics in Schools
Date Added:
01/06/2020
Immigration and Americanization, 1880-1930
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

This collection uses primary sources to explore immigration to the US and immigrant Americanization between 1880 and 1930. Digital Public Library of America Primary Source Sets are designed to help students develop their critical thinking skills and draw diverse material from libraries, archives, and museums across the United States. Each set includes an overview, ten to fifteen primary sources, links to related resources, and a teaching guide. These sets were created and reviewed by the teachers on the DPLA's Education Advisory Committee.

Subject:
History/Social Sciences
American History
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
Digital Public Library of America
Author:
Ella Howard
Date Added:
04/11/2016
Immigration, the Journey and After: "Things We Carry on the Sea" by Wang Ping and “Every Day We Get More Illegal” by Juan Felipe Herrera
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

Adapted from Holzer, Madeline Fuchs (2016). “Every Day We Get More Illegal” by Juan Felipe Herrera. Retrieved from https://edsitement.neh.gov/lesson-plans/every-day-we-get-more-illegal-juan-felipe-herrera. 

Subject:
Communication and Multimodal Literacy
Reading
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Josh Thompson
Bryan Harvey
Danielle De Arment-Donohue
Date Added:
11/27/2019
An Investigation Into Immigration and Migration in the United States
Rating

Students will use tables and visualizations of data about geographic mobility to explore rates and patterns of migration within, and immigration to, the United States. Using Census Bureau data tools, students will learn about past reasons for migration and immigration and understand the internal and external stresses of fluctuations in population.

Subject:
Cross-Curricular
History/Social Sciences
American History
Geography
Government and Civics
Mathematics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
U.S. Census Bureau
Provider Set:
Statistics in Schools
Date Added:
01/06/2020
Placing U.S. Immigration
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

This Story Map Journal has students analyzing the origins and destinations of immigrants during three main eras of U.S. immigration. Through analysis of migration flows, students will gain a better understanding of why people left their home countries when they did and consider why they settled where they did in the U.S. Finally, students will be asked to consider both history and current events to draft a plan for future U.S. immigration policy. Key questions: Where have immigrants settled in the United States and why? Contains links to student materials and teacher materials for creating lesson plans.What patterns of immigration and settlement are noticeable throughout history? How have Americans viewed immigrants over time? What push and pull factors have influenced migration to and within the U.S.? What should the U.S. do concerning immigration in the future?

Subject:
History/Social Sciences
American History
Geography
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson
Primary Source
Visual Media
Provider:
Virginia Geographic Alliance
Provider Set:
Placing Primary Sources Story Map Collection
Author:
Schaefer, Kameron
Date Added:
09/08/2018
Puerto Rican Migration to the US
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

This collection uses primary sources to explore Puerto Rican migration to the US. Digital Public Library of America Primary Source Sets are designed to help students develop their critical thinking skills and draw diverse material from libraries, archives, and museums across the United States. Each set includes an overview, ten to fifteen primary sources, links to related resources, and a teaching guide. These sets were created and reviewed by the teachers on the DPLA's Education Advisory Committee.

Subject:
History/Social Sciences
American History
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
Digital Public Library of America
Author:
Samantha Gibson
Date Added:
04/11/2016
A Refugee in Puerto Rico, 1942
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

A Refugee in Puerto Rico, 1942; Claude Lévi-Strauss and the burden of our personal archives.

Subject:
History/Social Sciences
American History
Geography
Government and Civics
Social Sciences
Material Type:
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Visual Media
Provider:
New American History
Provider Set:
Bunk
Author:
Breen, Benjamin
Date Added:
08/06/2017