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01: How the Monuments Came Down Series and Curriculum Guide introduction
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BEGIN HERE: How the Monuments Came Down Series and Curriculum Guide introduction: Introductory information about the series and curriculum guides, along with a linked list of the episodes in order. 

Subject:
History/Social Sciences
American History
Virginia History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Visual Media
Author:
#GoOpenVA Administrator
Date Added:
09/28/2021
02: The New South | How the Monuments Came Down
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Learn how enslaved African Americans in Richmond, Virginia, established what a historian in this clip calls “quasi-free communities, where they etched out lives for themselves, that paved the way forward.”  This resource is part of the How the Monuments Came Down collection.

Subject:
History/Social Sciences
American History
Virginia History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Primary Source
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Visual Media
Author:
Trish Reed
Date Added:
09/24/2021
03: Decoration Day | How the Monuments Came Down
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Discover the differing approaches to memorialization among African Americans and white southerners, in Richmond, Virginia, in the years immediately after the Civil War.  This resource is part of the How the Monuments Came Down collection.

Subject:
History/Social Sciences
American History
Virginia History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson
Visual Media
Author:
Trish Reed
Date Added:
09/24/2021
04: The Right to Vote | How the Monuments Came Down
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Discover how African American political organizing in Richmond, Virginia, in the first decades after the Civil War, secured a measure of power amid ongoing fights against injustice.   

Subject:
History/Social Sciences
American History
Virginia History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson
Primary Source
Visual Media
Author:
Trish Reed
Date Added:
09/24/2021
05: Lee Memorialization | How the Monuments Came Down
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Discover how white southerners in Richmond, Virginia, honored General Robert E. Lee through a monument of his likeness unveiled in the former Confederate capital in 1890. 

Subject:
History/Social Sciences
American History
Virginia History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson
Primary Source
Visual Media
Author:
Trish Reed
Date Added:
09/24/2021
06: John Mitchell, Jr. and Maggie L. Walker | How the Monuments Came Down
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Discover John Mitchell, Jr. and Maggie L Walker, two African American leaders in Richmond, Virginia, whom a historian in this clip refers to as “the vanguard” of Black resistance to white supremacy there. 

Subject:
History/Social Sciences
American History
Virginia History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson
Primary Source
Visual Media
Author:
Trish Reed
Date Added:
09/24/2021
07: Lost Cause Narrative and Building Monument Avenue | How the Monuments Came Down
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Learn why white city leaders in Richmond, Virginia, in the early 20th century, embraced the nationwide “City Beautiful” movement through the construction of Monument Avenue, a grand boulevard lined with statues to Confederates. 

Subject:
History/Social Sciences
American History
Virginia History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson
Primary Source
Visual Media
Author:
Trish Reed
Date Added:
09/24/2021
08: Caricatures of African Americans | How the Monuments Came Down
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Learn why blackface minstrelsy in the early 20th century sought to “parody and caricature Black ambition and achievement,” as explained by historians in this clip. Note to Teachers: The video clip, Caricatures of African Americans, includes depictions of blackface; in an effort to provide authentic and transparent resources about the historical experiences of Black Americans, these moments were not censored. 

Subject:
History/Social Sciences
American History
Virginia History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson
Primary Source
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Visual Media
Author:
Trish Reed
Date Added:
09/24/2021
09: Interstate 95 and the Destruction of Jackson Ward | How the Monuments Came Down
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Learn about Jackson Ward, a historic African American neighborhood in Richmond, Virginia, and why white city leaders supported the construction of an interstate highway through its center in the 1950s. 

Subject:
History/Social Sciences
American History
Virginia History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson
Primary Source
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Visual Media
Author:
Trish Reed
Date Added:
09/24/2021
10: Crusade for Voters | How the Monuments Came Down
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Discover the motivations, strategies, and success of the Crusade for Voters, a pathbreaking initiative that made possible the election of the first majority-Black city council in Richmond, Virginia, in 1977. 

Subject:
History/Social Sciences
American History
Virginia History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson
Primary Source
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Visual Media
Author:
Trish Reed
Date Added:
09/24/2021
11: First Majority-Black City Council | How the Monuments Came Down
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Learn why the first majority-Black city council in Richmond, Virginia, in the late 1970s, avoided discussion of the city’s Confederate monuments while attending to urgent crises of housing and education.  

Subject:
History/Social Sciences
American History
Virginia History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson
Primary Source
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Visual Media
Author:
Trish Reed
Date Added:
09/24/2021
12: Arthur Ashe | How the Monuments Came Down
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Learn about tennis champion Arthur Ashe, whose death spurred residents of his hometown of Richmond, Virginia, to honor him with a statue along a grand boulevard that had previously only featured statues of Confederates

Subject:
History/Social Sciences
American History
Virginia History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Primary Source
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Visual Media
Author:
Trish Reed
Date Added:
09/24/2021
13: African American Monuments | How the Monuments Came Down
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Learn how activists in Richmond, Virginia, are working to honor the lives of free and enslaved African Americans, in a city where the most prominent monuments had long celebrated Confederates. 

Subject:
History/Social Sciences
American History
Virginia History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson
Primary Source
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Visual Media
Author:
Trish Reed
Date Added:
09/24/2021
14: Maggie L. Walker Statue | How the Monuments Came Down
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See how descendants, community groups, and a National Park Service site worked together to establish a monument to Maggie L. Walker, an African American leader from Richmond, Virginia. 

Subject:
History/Social Sciences
American History
Virginia History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson
Primary Source
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Visual Media
Author:
Trish Reed
Date Added:
09/24/2021
15: Monument Avenue Commission | How the Monuments Came Down
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Learn how a mayoral commission attempted to reckon with Confederate monuments in Richmond, Virginia—and how political scandal and electoral change helped reshape the city’s statuary landscape. Note to Teachers:Some of these video clips include depictions of blackface; in an effort to provide authentic and transparent resources about the historical experiences of Black Americans, these moments were not censored. Sensitive: This resource contains material that may be sensitive for some students. Teachers should exercise discretion in evaluating whether this resource is suitable for their class.

Subject:
History/Social Sciences
American History
Virginia History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson
Primary Source
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Visual Media
Author:
Trish Reed
Date Added:
09/24/2021
16: Summer 2020 | How the Monuments Came Down
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Rating

Discover why protests in Richmond, Virginia, following the murder of George Floyd in Minneapolis, centered on Monument Avenue—a grand boulevard then-lined with statues of Confederates.

Subject:
History/Social Sciences
American History
Virginia History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Primary Source
Visual Media
Author:
Trish Reed
Date Added:
09/24/2021
17: Removal of Monuments | How the Monuments Came Down
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See the removal of Confederate monuments in Richmond, Virginia—first, through direct action by protestors, and then by city-ordered cranes—amid summer 2020 protests against systemic racism following the murder of George Floyd in Minneapolis. 

Subject:
History/Social Sciences
American History
Virginia History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson
Primary Source
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Visual Media
Author:
Trish Reed
Date Added:
09/24/2021
1883: Narratives of Resistance
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Author: Daniel Shogan, Danville Museum of Fine Arts and History Students will learn about the 1883 Massacre in Danville, Virginia as an example of racist mob violence against African Americans. Within the context of the massacre, they will be shown primary documents from the event. These documents will provide the students with not only a lens into the Danville of the nineteenth century, but also provide them with an opportunity to think critically about the biases present in some of the documents. After careful discussion of the events and outcomes of the massacre, the students will be given vocabulary worksheets that help to define and underline the most important elements of the narrative.

Subject:
History/Social Sciences
American History
Government and Civics
Virginia History
Material Type:
Lesson
Author:
#GoOpenVA Administrator
Date Added:
04/15/2021
18: Marcus-David Peters and Systemic Racism | How the Monuments Came Down
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Learn about Marcus-David Peters, a teacher in Richmond, Virginia, who was killed by police while having a mental health crisis, and why activists there see his death as one of many examples of how white supremacy endures in the city even as Confederate statues have been removed. 

Subject:
History/Social Sciences
American History
Virginia History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson
Primary Source
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Visual Media
Author:
Trish Reed
Date Added:
09/24/2021
19: How the Monuments Came Down Additional Resources
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CC BY-ND
Rating

How the Monuments Came Down explores the complex history of Richmond, Virginia through the lens of Confederate monuments, supported by an extensive visual record never before presented in a single work.Through personal stories from descendants and history-makers, the film uncovers how Confederate monuments came to shape Richmond’s landscape and why protestors demanded they come down.How the Monuments Came Down is a production of Field Studio, in association with VPM.

Subject:
History/Social Sciences
American History
Virginia History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson
Primary Source
Reading
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Author:
Trish Reed
Date Added:
09/24/2021
Acts of Resistance
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In this learning experience, the students will analyze multiple primary source documents as well as secondary information sources to understand this watershed event in Virginia and US History. The three men who will be studied in this experience ran away from their slave-holding captors and made their way to Fort Monroe. Upon arrival, military leadership at the fort claimed that the run-aways were enemy contraband and therefore could be confiscated by the Union forces. They were declared free through this war-time loophole and when the news spread, many other African Americans would soon start coming to Fort Monroe to claim their freedom as well.  Students begin by examining the records of enslaved people who ran away “to the enemy” (Union forces). Finally, students will use a Cost/Benefit analysis chart to guide their analysis of secondary information sources and develop an understanding of the concepts of resistance and a working knowledge of the event of Mallory, Baker, and Townsend sparking one of the first blows to the system of slavery.

Subject:
History/Social Sciences
American History
Virginia History
Material Type:
Lesson
Author:
#GoOpenVA Administrator
CHRISTOPHER MATHEWS
Date Added:
04/13/2021
African American Migration
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The students will analyze five primary resource images. A Jamboard activity focuses on the African American Great Migration and its push /pull factors (an attached slide show may be used as an alternative). The Jamboard activity allows for student participation, so it can be used as an observation teacher formative assessment.

Subject:
History/Social Sciences
American History
Virginia History
Material Type:
Lesson
Author:
#GoOpenVA Administrator
Lillian Allen-Brown
Date Added:
05/05/2021
African American Service in US War Efforts
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In this lesson, students will survey the extent of and experiences of African Americans in military service during US war efforts from the Revolution to the Vietnam Conflict using a Hyperdoc (see attached) that can be assigned using your LMS system.

Subject:
History/Social Sciences
American History
Government and Civics
Social Sciences
Virginia History
Material Type:
Lesson
Author:
#GoOpenVA Administrator
Holly Wikewitz Means
Date Added:
05/07/2021
America's 2nd Founding
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In this learning experience, the students will complete a primary source inquiry into the impacts of Reconstruction on Black experiences in Virginia and the South. The students will use the Claim-Evidence-Reasoning structure to defend one of two claims.Students will analyze sources that depict/detail Black experiences and perspectives before, during, and after the Reconstruction. This learning experience will be most effective after students have been introduced to the what and when of Reconstruction.

Subject:
History/Social Sciences
American History
Government and Civics
Virginia History
Material Type:
Lesson
Author:
#GoOpenVA Administrator
CHRISTOPHER MATHEWS
Date Added:
04/15/2021
Cases for Freedom
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Students will investigate through primary and secondary sources the dynamics of the development of race relations in early colonial Virginia from court cases between 1640 to 1656. The story and cases of John Punch (1640), John Casor (1655), and Elizabeth Key Grinstead (1656) are known to be some of the first freedom suits in the Virginia colony. Students will then investigate slave codes from 1705 to determine how colonial officials justified the treatment of enslaved people.

Subject:
History/Social Sciences
American History
Government and Civics
Social Sciences
Virginia History
Material Type:
Lesson
Author:
#GoOpenVA Administrator
Date Added:
05/07/2021
Civil Rights Sorting Cards
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Students will match the name, phrases and picture. The cards focus on the specific VDOE SOL essential knowledge, adapts to the required SOL 1 Primary resource learning components, and activates the multiple learning styles. The Task Cards allow multiple SOL strand concept review. The teacher can use them in a small group, tiered groupings, and independent study.

Subject:
History/Social Sciences
American History
Government and Civics
Virginia History
Material Type:
Lesson
Author:
#GoOpenVA Administrator
Lillian Allen-Brown
Date Added:
05/06/2021
Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen
Unrestricted Use
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This collection uses primary sources to explore the Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen. Digital Public Library of America Primary Source Sets are designed to help students develop their critical thinking skills and draw diverse material from libraries, archives, and museums across the United States. Each set includes an overview, ten to fifteen primary sources, links to related resources, and a teaching guide. These sets were created and reviewed by the teachers on the DPLA's Education Advisory Committee.

Subject:
History/Social Sciences
American History
Government and Civics
Virginia History
World History
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
Digital Public Library of America
Author:
Albert Robertson
Date Added:
04/11/2016
An Escape from Jim Crow
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This activity explores the push and pull of moving from Richmond, Virginia to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania for 4 siblings during the 1920s by examining primary and secondary sources and using a decision-making model. This activity includes topics such as the impact of segregation and discrimination against African Americans, and the impact of Black migration from the south to the north.

Subject:
History/Social Sciences
American History
Economics
Virginia History
Material Type:
Lesson
Author:
#GoOpenVA Administrator
Date Added:
04/21/2021
Explore the Life and Work of Louis Draper, Photographer and Virginian
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This resource presents a variety of digital resources hosted by Virginia Museum of Fine Arts that students can use to explore the life and work of renowned African-American photographer Louis Draper.  

Subject:
Research
Visual Art
History/Social Sciences
American History
Social Sciences
Virginia History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Visual Media
Author:
VMFA Virginia Museum of Fine Arts
Date Added:
02/07/2020
Exploring Virginia's Regions
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This article from the Virginia Geographer assists teachers to understand the geographic theme of region. It applies the region concept to the study of Virginia that goes well beyond the Virginia Standards of Learning limited use of landform regions. Region concept is applied to a number of human systems including transportation, economic, and urban systems.

Subject:
History/Social Sciences
American History
Geography
Virginia History
Material Type:
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Virginia Geographic Alliance
Provider Set:
Virginia Geographer Special Issue-Virginia Studies
Author:
Morrill, Robert W.
Date Added:
09/08/2005
Federalist Plots & Republican Schemes
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CC BY
Rating

This Project Based Assessment is meant to be completed over the course of at least two weeks, but as long as the instructor needs to implement. In this program, students will personify a prominent political figure in early American politics; either a Federalist or a Republican. After studying their figure's political writing, researching the figure's profile, and preparing talking points for a debate, students will debate a given question in the format of one of Chief Justice John Marshall's "Lawyers' Dinners" that he often held at his Richmond home. The dinner party debate will be composed of five Federalists, five Republicans, and a moderator. The students' goal is to convince the members of the opposite team to join their position on the given question. An instructor will take John Marshall's position as moderator and host over the party. For bonus fun and impact, students are invited to hold their Lawyers Dinner debate in the John Marshall House dining room.

Subject:
History/Social Sciences
American History
Government and Civics
Virginia History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
Preservation Virginia
Date Added:
04/13/2022
Freedom Rides
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The students will analyze the 6 primary resource image frames. The Jamboard activity focuses on the Civil Rights Movement’s Freedom Riders. In 1961, this group of volunteer participants rode interstate buses throughout the segregated southern United States. Their goal was to challenge the United States Supreme Court ruling “Separate but Equal” which was used to mandate separate black and white waiting rooms at the interstate bus stations. The last frame connects the fight for Civil Rights to the massive Black Lives Matter movement in Richmond, Virginia. 

Subject:
History/Social Sciences
American History
Virginia History
Material Type:
Lesson
Author:
#GoOpenVA Administrator
Lillian Allen-Brown
Date Added:
05/05/2021
The Great Migration
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The student will apply social science skills to understand how the nation grew and changed from the end of Reconstruction through the early twentieth century by e) evaluating and explaining the social and cultural impact of industrialization, including rapid urbanization; Great Migration.

Subject:
History/Social Sciences
American History
Geography
Government and Civics
Social Sciences
Virginia History
Material Type:
Lesson
Author:
#GoOpenVA Administrator
Holly Wikewitz Means
Date Added:
05/07/2021
HSS State Developed Common Rubric- Early Elementary
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Rating

The HSS State Developed Common Rubric- Early Elementary is for use with the 2015 History and Social Science Standards of Learning. As the common rubrics for history and social science are not grade or course specific, school divisions have the opportunity and autonomy to select the common rubric that best suits the needs of their students when scoring local alternative assessments.

Subject:
Humanities
History/Social Sciences
Virginia History
Material Type:
Student Guide
Provider:
Virginia Department of Education
Author:
Virginia Department of Education
Date Added:
12/21/2020
HSS State Developed Common Rubric- Upper Elementary
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-NC-ND
Rating

The HSS State Developed Common Rubric- Upper Elementary is for use with the 2015 History and Social Science Standards of Learning. As the common rubrics for history and social science are not grade or course specific, school divisions have the opportunity and autonomy to select the common rubric that best suits the needs of their students when scoring local alternative assessments.

Subject:
History/Social Sciences
Virginia History
Material Type:
Student Guide
Provider:
Virginia Department of Education
Author:
Virginia Department of Education
Date Added:
12/21/2020
HSS State Developed Common Rubric- Upper Secondary
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CC BY-NC-ND
Rating

The HSS State Developed Common Rubric- Upper Secondary is for use with the 2015 History and Social Science Standards of Learning. The Upper Secondary rubric is not course-specific and should be used in both Virginia and U.S. History and Government high school courses.

Subject:
History/Social Sciences
American History
Government and Civics
Virginia History
Material Type:
Assessment
Student Guide
Provider:
Virginia Department of Education
Author:
Virginia Department of Education
Date Added:
12/30/2020
Historical Emojis
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

This Social Studes lessons incorporates the use of emoljis as a way of informal communication. Students will create emojis in the spaces provided that communicate each statement. This is an opportunity for students to be creative while reviewing the material in Virginia Studies.

Subject:
Impacts of Computing
Virginia History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
Christopher McElraft
Date Added:
04/19/2022
How The Monuments Came Down - VPM
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CC BY-ND
Rating

How the Monuments Came Down explores the complex history of Richmond, Virginia through the lens of Confederate monuments, supported by an extensive visual record never before presented in a single work.

Through personal stories from descendants and history-makers, the film uncovers how Confederate monuments came to shape Richmond’s landscape and why protestors demanded they come down.

In this collection, you will find film clips and learning resources designed to engage students with primary sources found in the film. These curriculum resources were written by Rodney Robinson, the 2019 National Teacher of the Year and a 20-year veteran of Richmond Public Schools. For a PDF version of the guide, with extension activities, visit vpm.org/monuments.

How the Monuments Came Down is a production of Field Studio, in association with VPM.

Subject:
History/Social Sciences
American History
Virginia History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson
Primary Source
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Visual Media
Provider:
VPM
Provider Set:
How the Monuments Came Down
Author:
and Edited by: Hannah Ayers and Lance Warren
Directed
Executive Producers: Steve Humble and Mason Mills
Outreach producer: Todd Waldo
Produced
Story advisors: Christy Coleman Julian Hayter Enjoli Moon Joseph Rogers
Support Material Credits: Written by Rodney Robinson
Date Added:
09/24/2021
How the Monuments Came Down PBS Learning Media
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-ND
Rating

How the Monuments Came Down explores the complex history of Richmond, Virginia through the lens of Confederate monuments, supported by an extensive visual record never before presented in a single work.

Through personal stories from descendants and history-makers, the film uncovers how Confederate monuments came to shape Richmond’s landscape and why protestors demanded they come down.

In this collection, you will find film clips and learning resources designed to engage students with primary sources found in the film. These curriculum resources were written by Rodney Robinson, the 2019 National Teacher of the Year and a 20-year veteran of Richmond Public Schools. For a PDF version of the guide, with extension activities, visit vpm.org/monuments.

How the Monuments Came Down is a production of Field Studio, in association with VPM.

Subject:
History/Social Sciences
American History
Virginia History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson
Primary Source
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Visual Media
Provider:
VPM
Provider Set:
How the Monuments Came Down
Author:
and Edited by: Hannah Ayers and Lance Warren
Directed
Produced
Date Added:
09/24/2021
Influence of Earlier Documents on the Constitution of the United States
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

The students will see how earlier historical documents influenced the creation of the Constitution of the United States. The graphic organizers will help the students understand the influence of five documents: the Magna Carta, the Charters of the Virginia Company of London, the Virginia Declaration of Rights, the Declaration of Independence, the Articles of Confederation, and the Virginia Statute for Religious Freedom.

Subject:
American History
Government and Civics
Virginia History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Charles Baumgardner
Date Added:
01/06/2020