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African-American Literature
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This course considers the impact of storytelling and spirituals on the literary production of African American authors from the Colonial period to the current day, examining the cultural, historical, and political contexts of the literature, as well as how the issues of gender, race, and class affect the production and meaning of these works. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: identify the cultural influences and the development of African American literature; analyze the evolution of African American literature from an oral to a literary tradition; define the functions of African American literature from its inception in the period of slavery to the contemporary period; identify the major authors and/or literary works in the various literary periods and movements (Reconstruction to the New Negro Renaissance Movement; Harlem Renaissance; Realism, Naturalism, and modernism; Black Arts; and the Contemporary Period). This free course may be completed online at any time. (English Literature 411)

Subject:
English
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
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Reading
Syllabus
Textbook
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
06/11/2019
Artificial Intelligence
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This course includes materials on AI programming, logic, search, game playing, machine learning, natural language understanding, and robotics, which will introduce the student to AI methods, tools, and techniques, their application to computational problems, and their contribution to understanding intelligence. The material is introductory; the readings cite many resources outside those assigned in this course, and students are encouraged to explore these resources to pursue topics of interest. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: Describe the major applications, topics, and research areas of artificial intelligence (AI), including search, machine learning, knowledge representation and inference, natural language processing, vision, and robotics; Apply basic techniques of AI in computational solutions to problems; Discuss the role of AI research areas in growing the understanding of human intelligence; Identify the boundaries of the capabilities of current AI systems. (Computer Science 405)

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Reading
Syllabus
Textbook
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
06/11/2019
Art of Ancient Egypt and the Ancient Near East
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This course serves as an introduction to the major artistic and architectural traditions of Ancient Egypt and the Ancient Near East. This course will explore how artifacts and monuments can be used to study the history and culture of the ancient world. It is divided into two units that chronologically focus on the art, architecture, and archaeology of each region. The first unit examines Ancient Egyptian tombs, monuments, and art from the Early Dynastic (c. 3100-2650 BCE) through the Roman (30 BCE- 4thcentury CE) periods. The second unit focuses on Ancient Near Eastern artistic and architectural traditions from the late Neolithic (c. 9500-4500 BCE) through the conquest of the Achaemenid Persian Empire (550-330 BCE) by Alexander the Great. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: Identify major ancient Egyptian and Near Eastern architectural sites, monuments, and works of art; Identify the general characteristics of ancient Egyptian and Near Eastern art and recognize the names and characteristics of the major art historical time periods of each region; Describe how art and architecture can be used to understand the politics, history, and culture of Ancient Egypt and the Near East; Explain ancient Egyptian and Near Eastern cosmology, conceptions of the afterlife, and kingship, as well as their relationship to architectural sites, monuments, and works of art. (Art History 201)

Subject:
Fine Arts
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Full Course
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Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
06/11/2019
Art of Ancient Greece and Rome
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In this course, the student will study the art of Classical Antiquity. The different units of the course reflect the main chronological stages in art development in Ancient Greece and Rome, from the coming together of the Greek city-state and the emergence of ĺÎĺĺĺŤgeometric art (around 900 B.C.) to the fourth century A.D. shift that took place within Roman culture and art due to the growing influence of Christianity. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: Explain why ancient Greek and Roman art can be studied together as ĺÎĺĺĺŤthe art of Classical Antiquity; Trace the timeline of major events in Ancient Greece and Rome; Link important developments in the history of Ancient Greece and Rome to specific geographical contexts; Explain how important historical developments and social-historical contexts had an impact on artĺÎĺĺÎĺs evolution in Ancient Greece and Rome; Identify the important stylistic and technical developments of Ancient Greek and Roman art; Discuss important artworks, presenting relevant information on each workĺÎĺĺÎĺs historical context and constitution; Discuss important artists in terms of the style of their work. (Art History 202)

Subject:
Fine Arts
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
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Lecture
Reading
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Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
06/11/2019
Baltimore Food Systems: A Case Study of Urban Food Environments
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This seminar-style course challenges students to look closely at the environment of Baltimore City's complex food systems and to consider what it would take to improve these systems to assure access for all to nutritious, adequate, affordable and sustainably produced food. Students "go backstage" with tour guides at sites including a supermarket, a corner store, an emergency food distribution center, and a farm connected to the city school system. Students learn about the types of food available at these sites, who uses them, relevant aspects of their operations, and site-relevant key barriers to and opportunities for providing access to healthier food, ideally with reduced environmental harm. They also conduct oral history interviews about food with elderly city residents to understand how food access has changed over the years. Class discussions, lectures, readings, and guest speakers support critical thinking, and provide background and frameworks for understanding the experiential sessions. Lectures and discussions consider applicability of lessons gained from the study of Baltimore to other area food systems. Throughout, students consider the relative impacts of access, demand, and stakeholder interests, and consider the relative strengths of voluntary, governmental, legal and other strategies. For their final papers, students apply the Intervention Decision Matrix to selected aspects of the city's food systems and food environments, identifying challenges and opportunities for change, incorporating lessons learned from other food systems and programs, and discussing implications beyond Baltimore .

Subject:
Health and Medical Sciences
Material Type:
Full Course
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Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
Provider Set:
JHSPH OpenCourseWare
Author:
Anne Palmer
Roni Neff
Date Added:
01/15/2009
Biostatistics for Medical Product Regulation
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This course provides a broad understanding of the application of biostatistics in a regulatory context. Reviews the relevant regulations and guidance documents. Includes topics such as basic study design, target population, comparison groups, and endpoints. Addresses analysis issues with emphasis on the regulatory aspects, including issues of missing data and informative censoring. Discusses safety monitoring, interim analysis and early termination of trials with a focus on regulatory implications.

Subject:
Health and Medical Sciences
Material Type:
Full Course
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
Provider Set:
JHSPH OpenCourseWare
Author:
Mary Foulkes
Simon Day
Date Added:
09/15/2008
Business Statistics
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Introductory survey of quantitative methods (QM), or the application of statistics in the workplace. Examines techniques for gathering, analyzing, and interpreting data in any number of fieldsĺÎĺ from anthropology to hedge fund management.

Subject:
Probability and Statistics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Full Course
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Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
06/11/2019
Calculus I
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This course begins with a review of algebra specifically designed to help and prepare the student for the study of calculus, and continues with discussion of functions, graphs, limits, continuity, and derivatives. The appendix provides a large collection of reference facts, geometry, and trigonometry that will assist in solving calculus problems long after the course is over. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: calculate or estimate limits of functions given by formulas, graphs, or tables by using properties of limits and LĺÎĺ_ĺĚĺ_hopitalĺÎĺ_ĺĚĺ_s Rule; state whether a function given by a graph or formula is continuous or differentiable at a given point or on a given interval and justify the answer; calculate average and instantaneous rates of change in context, and state the meaning and units of the derivative for functions given graphically; calculate derivatives of polynomial, rational, common transcendental functions, and implicitly defined functions; apply the ideas and techniques of derivatives to solve maximum and minimum problems and related rate problems, and calculate slopes and rates for function given as parametric equations; find extreme values of modeling functions given by formulas or graphs; predict, construct, and interpret the shapes of graphs; solve equations using NewtonĺÎĺ_ĺĚĺ_s Method; find linear approximations to functions using differentials; festate in words the meanings of the solutions to applied problems, attaching the appropriate units to an answer; state which parts of a mathematical statement are assumptions, such as hypotheses, and which parts are conclusions. This free course may be completed online at any time. It has been developed through a partnership with the Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges; the Saylor Foundation has modified some WSBCTC materials. (Mathematics 005)

Subject:
Calculus & Beyond
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
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Syllabus
Textbook
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
06/11/2019
Capitalism and Democracy in America
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The purpose of this course is to trace the twin paths of capitalism and democracy through American history. This course is premised on the idea that capitalism and democracy are intertwined, though they have often conflicted with one another. It provides students with a brief introduction to the history of capitalism and democracy in Europe and then to explore how they evolved in North America between 1600 and the present. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: define and identify the terms 'capitalism' and 'democracy' in a variety of different modern historical eras; identify and define the historical connections between capitalism and democracy and identify periods of tension between capitalism and democracy, explaining how they both strengthen and weaken one another; identify important events, personalities, and concepts related to American democracy and capitalism; identify and describe the emergence and development of both capitalism and democracy in the United States; identify and describe the different periods of American history as they relate to the concepts of capitalism and democracy. (History 312)

Subject:
American History
Economics
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Textbook
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
06/11/2019
Compilers
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This course introduces the compilation process, presenting foundational topics on formal languages and outline each of the essential compiler steps: scanning, parsing, translation and semantic analysis, code generation, and optimization. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: describe the compilation process and explain the function of the components that comprise the structure of a compiler; apply concepts of formal languages and finite-state machines to the translation of computer languages; identify the compiler techniques, methods, and tools that are applicable to other software applications; describe the challenges and state-of-the-practice of compiler theory and practice. This free course may be completed online at any time. (Computer Science 304)

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Textbook
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
06/11/2019
Cryptography
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This course introduces cryptography by addressing topics such as ciphers that were used before World War II, block cipher algorithms, the advanced encryption standard for a symmetric-key encryption adopted by the U.S. government, MD5 and SHA-1 hash functions, and the message authentication code. The course will focus on public key cryptography (as exemplified by the RSA algorithm), elliptic curves, the Diffie-Hellman key exchange, and the elliptic curve discrete logarithm problem. The course concludes with key exchange methods, study signature schemes, and discussion of public key infrastructure. Note: It is strongly recommended that you complete an abstract algebra course (such as the Saylor FoundationĺÎĺ_ĺĚĺ_s MA231) before taking this course. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: explain how symmetric and asymmetric key ciphers work; list and define cryptographyĺÎĺ_ĺĚĺ_s goals; list and define the most common classical ciphers; explain the workings of mechanical ciphers Enigma and Lorenz; describe the principles of substitution-permutation networks; describe the algorithms for data encryption and the advanced encryption standard; describe and use the MD5 and SHA-1 hash functions; explain the idea behind public key cryptography; use the RSA cryptography system by applying it to practical problems; test whether the large integer is prime with the mathematical tools presented in this course; define the elliptic curve and use it in cryptography; explain the Diffie-Hellman key exchange; describe the most common signature and autokey identity schemes; describe the conceptual workings of public key infrastructure. This free course may be completed online at any time. (Computer Science 409)

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Reading
Syllabus
Textbook
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
06/11/2019
Educational Psychology
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Educational psychologists work to understand how to structure educational systems in order to meet the mental and emotional needs of students. They study how people learn, identify and suggest efficient teaching methods, and evaluate the effectiveness of various educational policies and practices. Educational psychologists often point out the inherently social nature of our current educational system, study the ways that learning environments affect education, and study the ways that societal, local, and family issues affect learning and classroom practice. Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to: explain why knowledge of psychology is important to effective teaching; discuss, compare, and contrast cognitive and behavioral psychology; discuss, compare, and contrast constructivist and behaviorist models of teaching and learning, as well as their applications in classroom management; identify important cognitive stages of development, the typical age range of each stage, and the ways that teachers can use that knowledge; identify important aspects of personal, emotional, and moral development, and ways that teachers can use that knowledge; identify diversity in terms of differences in learning styles, intelligence, cultures, and gender, as well as specific abilities and disabilities, that a modern classroom might need to accommodate; discuss theories of motivation and defend those you would use in your classroom; discuss classroom management strategies that smooth the learning process and prevent or deal with misbehavior, and defend those strategies you would use in your classroom; identify communication skills that enhance learning, management, and coordination with students' families; identify strategies for enhancing students' ability to use complex cognitive skills; identify the major parts of a lesson or unit plan; identify and discuss types of teacher-made assessments; discuss the uses of and issues surrounding standardized testing; identify and discuss factors that influence job satisfaction in a teaching career. (Psychology 303)

Subject:
Social Sciences
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
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Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
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Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
06/11/2019
English Language Arts 10
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This course is oriented toward US high school students in grade 10. Its structure and materials are aligned to the US Common Core Standards. You will be expected to build literary analysis from the texts as well as outside sources of knowledge. By the conclusion of this course, you will be prepared for the material in upper level high school English courses (and, subsequently, collegiate texts). You will be able to read and interpret more autonomously, and you will be able to handle more rigorous texts with fewer instructional supports

Subject:
English
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
06/11/2019
English Language Arts 8
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This course is oriented toward US middle school students in grade 8. Its structure and materials are aligned to the US Common Core Standards. Includes readings from: Johann David, Jack Gantos, and Avi.

Subject:
English
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
06/11/2019
Essentials of Probability and Statistical Inference IV: Algorithmic and Nonparametric Approaches
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Introduces the theory and application of modern, computationally-based methods for exploring and drawing inferences from data. Covers re-sampling methods, non-parametric regression, prediction, and dimension reduction and clustering. Specific topics include Monte Carlo simulation, bootstrap cross-validation, splines, local weighted regression, CART, random forests, neural networks, support vector machines, and hierarchical clustering. De-emphasizes proofs and replaces them with extended discussion of interpretation of results and simulation and data analysis for illustration.

Subject:
Health and Medical Sciences
Material Type:
Full Course
Lecture Notes
Syllabus
Provider:
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
Provider Set:
JHSPH OpenCourseWare
Author:
Irizarry, Rafael
Date Added:
06/10/2019
General Chemistry I
Conditions of Use:
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This survey chemistry course is designed to introduce students to the world of chemistry. In this course, we will study chemistry from the ground up, learning the basics of the atom and its behavior. We will apply this knowledge to understand the chemical properties of matter and the changes and reactions that take place in all types of matter. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: Define the general term 'chemistry.' Distinguish between the physical and chemical properties of matter. Distinguish between mixtures and pure substances. Describe the arrangement of the periodic table. Perform mathematical operations involving significant figures. Convert measurements into scientific notation. Explain the law of conservation of mass, the law of definite composition, and the law of multiple proportions. Summarize the essential points of Dalton's atomic theory. Define the term 'atom.' Describe electron configurations. Draw Lewis structures for molecules. Name ionic and covalent compounds using the rules for nomenclature of inorganic compounds. Explain the relationship between enthalpy change and a reaction's tendency to occur. (Chemistry 101; See also: Biology 105. Mechanical Engineering 004)

Subject:
Matter
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Textbook
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
06/11/2019
Geometry
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In this course, you will study the relationships between lines and angles. You will learn to calculate how much space an object covers, determine how much space is inside of a three-dimensional object, and other relationships between shapes, objects, and the mathematics that govern them.

Subject:
Mathematics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
06/11/2019
Global Perspectives on Industrialization
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This course will focus on the emergence and evolution of industrial societies around the world. The student will begin by comparing the legacies of industry in ancient and early modern Europe and Asia and examining the agricultural and commercial advances that laid the groundwork for the Industrial Revolution. The student will then follow the history of industrialization in different parts of the world, taking a close look at the economic, social, and environmental effects of industrialization. This course ultimately examines how industrialization developed, spread across the globe, and shaped everyday life in the modern era. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: identify key ideas and events in the history of industrialization; identify connections between the development of capitalism and the development of modern industry; use analytical tools to evaluate the factors contributing to industrial change in different societies; identify the consequences of industrialization in the 19th and 20th centuries in different societies; critique historical interpretations of the causes and effects of industrialization; and analyze and interpret primary source documents describing the process of industrialization and life in industrial societies. (History 363)

Subject:
Economics
World History
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Textbook
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
06/11/2019
HTML and CSS for Beginners
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This course provides students with an introduction to the core technologies used to communicate information on the Web: Hypertext Markup Language (HTML) and Cascading Style Sheets (CSS). These skills enable professionals to troubleshoot minor problems and to intelligently communicate with clients, collaborators, Information Technology staff within a company, or outside contractors in order to maintain, modify, or produce complicated web-based projects.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Provider Set:
Saylor Academy Professional Development
Date Added:
05/24/2019
Intermediate Macroeconomics
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In this course, the student will build on and apply what you learned in the introductory macroeconomics course. The student will use the concepts of output, unemployment, inflation, consumption, and investment to study the dynamics of an economy at a more advanced level. As the course progresses, the student will gain a better appreciation for how policy shifts and changes in one sector impact the rest of the macroeconomy (whether the impacts are intended or unintended). The student will also examine the causes of inflation and depression, and discuss various approaches to responding to them. By the end of this course, the student should be able to think critically about the economy and develop your own unique perspective on various issues. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: Explain the standard theory in macroeconomics at an intermediate level; Explain and use the basic tools of macroeconomic theory, and apply them to help address problems in public policy; Analyze the role of government in allocating scarce resources; Explain how inflation affects entire economic systems; Synthesize the impact of employment and unemployment in a free market economy; Build macroeconomic models to describe changes over time in monetary and fiscal policy; Compare and contrast arguments concerning business, consumers and government, and make good conjectures regarding the possible solutions; Analyze the methods of computing and explaining how much is produced in an economy; Apply basic tools that are used in many fields of economics, including uncertainty, capital and investment, and economic growth. (Economics 202)

Subject:
Economics
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Reading
Syllabus
Textbook
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
06/11/2019