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2020-2021 Syllabus
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This is the syllabus for the 2020-2021 school year for special education services provided by Mr. Hooper.

Subject:
Special Education
Material Type:
Syllabus
Author:
Jamie Hooper
Date Added:
06/10/2020
Actor's Contract Template
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A clear outline for student expectations during rehearsals, class, tech week, and/or production days.Keep them focused and accountable and modify to fit the needs of your program.Can be used for class syllabus or after school/in class productions.

Subject:
Theater
Material Type:
Student Guide
Syllabus
Author:
Lorin Mello
Date Added:
08/21/2022
Artificial Intelligence
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This course includes materials on AI programming, logic, search, game playing, machine learning, natural language understanding, and robotics, which will introduce the student to AI methods, tools, and techniques, their application to computational problems, and their contribution to understanding intelligence. The material is introductory; the readings cite many resources outside those assigned in this course, and students are encouraged to explore these resources to pursue topics of interest. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: Describe the major applications, topics, and research areas of artificial intelligence (AI), including search, machine learning, knowledge representation and inference, natural language processing, vision, and robotics; Apply basic techniques of AI in computational solutions to problems; Discuss the role of AI research areas in growing the understanding of human intelligence; Identify the boundaries of the capabilities of current AI systems. (Computer Science 405)

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Reading
Syllabus
Textbook
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
06/11/2019
Business Statistics
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Introductory survey of quantitative methods (QM), or the application of statistics in the workplace. Examines techniques for gathering, analyzing, and interpreting data in any number of fieldsĺÎĺ from anthropology to hedge fund management.

Subject:
Probability and Statistics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
06/11/2019
Calculus I
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This course begins with a review of algebra specifically designed to help and prepare the student for the study of calculus, and continues with discussion of functions, graphs, limits, continuity, and derivatives. The appendix provides a large collection of reference facts, geometry, and trigonometry that will assist in solving calculus problems long after the course is over. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: calculate or estimate limits of functions given by formulas, graphs, or tables by using properties of limits and LĺÎĺ_ĺĚĺ_hopitalĺÎĺ_ĺĚĺ_s Rule; state whether a function given by a graph or formula is continuous or differentiable at a given point or on a given interval and justify the answer; calculate average and instantaneous rates of change in context, and state the meaning and units of the derivative for functions given graphically; calculate derivatives of polynomial, rational, common transcendental functions, and implicitly defined functions; apply the ideas and techniques of derivatives to solve maximum and minimum problems and related rate problems, and calculate slopes and rates for function given as parametric equations; find extreme values of modeling functions given by formulas or graphs; predict, construct, and interpret the shapes of graphs; solve equations using NewtonĺÎĺ_ĺĚĺ_s Method; find linear approximations to functions using differentials; festate in words the meanings of the solutions to applied problems, attaching the appropriate units to an answer; state which parts of a mathematical statement are assumptions, such as hypotheses, and which parts are conclusions. This free course may be completed online at any time. It has been developed through a partnership with the Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges; the Saylor Foundation has modified some WSBCTC materials. (Mathematics 005)

Subject:
Calculus & Beyond
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Reading
Syllabus
Textbook
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
06/11/2019
ClicaBrasil
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The Portuguese language lessons of ClicaBrasil highlight aspects of Brazilian culture. They are designed for intermediate to advanced students, but are accessible to everyone. Each lesson includes videos of Brazilians from all walks of life speaking naturally about their lives and their country. All lessons integrate reading, writing, listening and comprehension, grammar, vocabulary, oral communication and cultural activities with the videos. This is also available as a free PDF textbook and as print on demand.

Subject:
World Languages
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Syllabus
Textbook
Provider:
University of Texas at Austin
Provider Set:
COERLL
Author:
Flanzer, Vivian
Date Added:
06/06/2022
Compilers
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This course introduces the compilation process, presenting foundational topics on formal languages and outline each of the essential compiler steps: scanning, parsing, translation and semantic analysis, code generation, and optimization. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: describe the compilation process and explain the function of the components that comprise the structure of a compiler; apply concepts of formal languages and finite-state machines to the translation of computer languages; identify the compiler techniques, methods, and tools that are applicable to other software applications; describe the challenges and state-of-the-practice of compiler theory and practice. This free course may be completed online at any time. (Computer Science 304)

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Textbook
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
06/11/2019
Comprehensive School Counseling Toolbox
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Planning tools and resources for planning a comprehensive school counseling program. Please note the following templates are in draft form. We are asking school counselors to “field test” them and provide feedback before we publish them for statewide access.

Subject:
Humanities
Material Type:
Syllabus
Author:
Sarah Bazemore
Date Added:
10/17/2022
Cryptography
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This course introduces cryptography by addressing topics such as ciphers that were used before World War II, block cipher algorithms, the advanced encryption standard for a symmetric-key encryption adopted by the U.S. government, MD5 and SHA-1 hash functions, and the message authentication code. The course will focus on public key cryptography (as exemplified by the RSA algorithm), elliptic curves, the Diffie-Hellman key exchange, and the elliptic curve discrete logarithm problem. The course concludes with key exchange methods, study signature schemes, and discussion of public key infrastructure. Note: It is strongly recommended that you complete an abstract algebra course (such as the Saylor FoundationĺÎĺ_ĺĚĺ_s MA231) before taking this course. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: explain how symmetric and asymmetric key ciphers work; list and define cryptographyĺÎĺ_ĺĚĺ_s goals; list and define the most common classical ciphers; explain the workings of mechanical ciphers Enigma and Lorenz; describe the principles of substitution-permutation networks; describe the algorithms for data encryption and the advanced encryption standard; describe and use the MD5 and SHA-1 hash functions; explain the idea behind public key cryptography; use the RSA cryptography system by applying it to practical problems; test whether the large integer is prime with the mathematical tools presented in this course; define the elliptic curve and use it in cryptography; explain the Diffie-Hellman key exchange; describe the most common signature and autokey identity schemes; describe the conceptual workings of public key infrastructure. This free course may be completed online at any time. (Computer Science 409)

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Reading
Syllabus
Textbook
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
06/11/2019
Français interactif
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Français interactif is a unique, award-winning 1st-year French curriculum used by learners all over the world. Students explore French language and culture by following the lives of real students who have participated in the UT Summer Program in Lyon, France. The online curriculum includes over 320 videos, vocabulary and phonetics audio, online grammar reference with self-correcting exercises and audio dialogues, verb conjugation and practice tools, internet activities, and a textbook of classroom exercises. Franais interactif was awarded the 2009 CALICO Esperanto Access to Language Education Award and the National Endowment for the Humanities EDSITEment Best of Humanities on the Web award (2005)

Subject:
World Languages
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Syllabus
Provider:
University of Texas at Austin
Provider Set:
COERLL
Author:
Blyth, Carl
Guilloteau, Nancy
Kelton, Karen
Date Added:
06/06/2022
General Chemistry I
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This survey chemistry course is designed to introduce students to the world of chemistry. In this course, we will study chemistry from the ground up, learning the basics of the atom and its behavior. We will apply this knowledge to understand the chemical properties of matter and the changes and reactions that take place in all types of matter. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: Define the general term 'chemistry.' Distinguish between the physical and chemical properties of matter. Distinguish between mixtures and pure substances. Describe the arrangement of the periodic table. Perform mathematical operations involving significant figures. Convert measurements into scientific notation. Explain the law of conservation of mass, the law of definite composition, and the law of multiple proportions. Summarize the essential points of Dalton's atomic theory. Define the term 'atom.' Describe electron configurations. Draw Lewis structures for molecules. Name ionic and covalent compounds using the rules for nomenclature of inorganic compounds. Explain the relationship between enthalpy change and a reaction's tendency to occur. (Chemistry 101; See also: Biology 105. Mechanical Engineering 004)

Subject:
Matter
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Textbook
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
06/11/2019
Geometry
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In this course, you will study the relationships between lines and angles. You will learn to calculate how much space an object covers, determine how much space is inside of a three-dimensional object, and other relationships between shapes, objects, and the mathematics that govern them.

Subject:
Mathematics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
06/11/2019
Global Perspectives on Industrialization
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This course will focus on the emergence and evolution of industrial societies around the world. The student will begin by comparing the legacies of industry in ancient and early modern Europe and Asia and examining the agricultural and commercial advances that laid the groundwork for the Industrial Revolution. The student will then follow the history of industrialization in different parts of the world, taking a close look at the economic, social, and environmental effects of industrialization. This course ultimately examines how industrialization developed, spread across the globe, and shaped everyday life in the modern era. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: identify key ideas and events in the history of industrialization; identify connections between the development of capitalism and the development of modern industry; use analytical tools to evaluate the factors contributing to industrial change in different societies; identify the consequences of industrialization in the 19th and 20th centuries in different societies; critique historical interpretations of the causes and effects of industrialization; and analyze and interpret primary source documents describing the process of industrialization and life in industrial societies. (History 363)

Subject:
Economics
World History
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Textbook
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
06/11/2019
HTML and CSS for Beginners
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This course provides students with an introduction to the core technologies used to communicate information on the Web: Hypertext Markup Language (HTML) and Cascading Style Sheets (CSS). These skills enable professionals to troubleshoot minor problems and to intelligently communicate with clients, collaborators, Information Technology staff within a company, or outside contractors in order to maintain, modify, or produce complicated web-based projects.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Provider Set:
Saylor Academy Professional Development
Date Added:
05/24/2019
Intermediate Macroeconomics
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In this course, the student will build on and apply what you learned in the introductory macroeconomics course. The student will use the concepts of output, unemployment, inflation, consumption, and investment to study the dynamics of an economy at a more advanced level. As the course progresses, the student will gain a better appreciation for how policy shifts and changes in one sector impact the rest of the macroeconomy (whether the impacts are intended or unintended). The student will also examine the causes of inflation and depression, and discuss various approaches to responding to them. By the end of this course, the student should be able to think critically about the economy and develop your own unique perspective on various issues. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: Explain the standard theory in macroeconomics at an intermediate level; Explain and use the basic tools of macroeconomic theory, and apply them to help address problems in public policy; Analyze the role of government in allocating scarce resources; Explain how inflation affects entire economic systems; Synthesize the impact of employment and unemployment in a free market economy; Build macroeconomic models to describe changes over time in monetary and fiscal policy; Compare and contrast arguments concerning business, consumers and government, and make good conjectures regarding the possible solutions; Analyze the methods of computing and explaining how much is produced in an economy; Apply basic tools that are used in many fields of economics, including uncertainty, capital and investment, and economic growth. (Economics 202)

Subject:
Economics
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Reading
Syllabus
Textbook
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
06/11/2019
Intermediate Microeconomics
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This course is designed to extend the student's knowledge of the basic microeconomic principles that will provide the foundation for their future work in economics and give them insight into how economic models can help us think about important real world phenomena. Topics include supply and demand interaction, utility maximization, profit maximization, elasticity, perfect competition, monopoly power, imperfect competition, and game theory. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: Explain the standard theory in microeconomics at an intermediate level; Explain and use the basic tools of microeconomic theory, and apply them to help address problems in public policy; Analyze the role of markets in allocating scarce resources; Explain both competitive markets, for which basic models of supply and demand are most appropriate, and markets in which agents act strategically, for which game theory is the more appropriate tool; Synthesize the impact of government intervention in the market; Develop quantitative skills in doing economic cost and consumer analysis using calculus; Compare and contrast arguments concerning business and politics, and make good conjectures regarding the possible solutions; Analyze the economic behavior of individuals and firms, and explore how they respond to changes in the opportunities and constraints that they face and how they interact in markets; Apply basic tools that are used in many fields of economics, including household economics, labor economics, production theory, international economics, natural resource economics, public finance, and capital markets. (Economics 201)

Subject:
Economics
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Reading
Syllabus
Textbook
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
06/11/2019
Interviewing Skills
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This course is intended to help you showcase your personality, strengths, interests, and abilities to potential employers through the interview process.

Subject:
Business and Information Technology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Provider Set:
Saylor Academy Professional Development
Date Added:
05/24/2019
Introduction to Statistics
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This course covers descriptive statistics, the foundation of statistics, probability and random distributions, and the relationships between various characteristics of data. Upon successful completion of the course, the student will be able to: Define the meaning of descriptive statistics and statistical inference; Distinguish between a population and a sample; Explain the purpose of measures of location, variability, and skewness; Calculate probabilities; Explain the difference between how probabilities are computed for discrete and continuous random variables; Recognize and understand discrete probability distribution functions, in general; Identify confidence intervals for means and proportions; Explain how the central limit theorem applies in inference; Calculate and interpret confidence intervals for one population average and one population proportion; Differentiate between Type I and Type II errors; Conduct and interpret hypothesis tests; Compute regression equations for data; Use regression equations to make predictions; Conduct and interpret ANOVA (Analysis of Variance). (Mathematics 121; See also: Biology 104, Computer Science 106, Economics 104, Psychology 201)

Subject:
Probability and Statistics
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Syllabus
Textbook
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
06/11/2019
Management Information Systems (Business 206)
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Management Information Systems (MIS) is a formal discipline within business education that bridges the gap between computer science and the well-known business disciplines of finance, marketing, and management.

Subject:
Business and Information Technology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
06/11/2019
Principles of Finance (Business 202)
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In this course, you will be exposed to a number of different sub-fields within finance. You will learn how to determine which projects have the best potential payoff, to manage investments, and even to value stocks. In the end, you will discover that all finance boils down to one concept: return. In essence, finance asks: ŇIf I give you money today, how much money will I get back in the future?Ó Though the answer to this question will vary widely from case to case, by the time you finish this course, you will know how to find the answer.

Subject:
Personal Finance
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
06/11/2019